If you are still reading this then perhaps you are looking for a simple and reliable way to number a couple of lists in a Word document. If you read John's article then you have already been informed that field numbering is simple and robust. If you are like 9 out of 10 Word users in my office then anything more than 1. space space Blah, blah "enter" 2. space space Blah, blah ... defies simple! If that applies to you, then the "SeqField Numbering" Add-In presented later in this page is for you.

This one is EASY. In InDesign, with a one-sided NCR form, cut the all elements from the first page. Go to your Master page and place. Where you are going to number the forms, draw a text box and insert a page number marker there. Format it to your liking, then insert as many pages as SETS are going to be made. When you go to print, enter 2 or 3 in the copies box, depending if it's 2-part or 3-part and under the properties button, select GROUPED or UNCOLLATED, turn off OFFSET. Violá!

when I assign a heading level to a figure, all the other figures at different heading levels change to the level I assigned the new figure. ie, I have a figure under chapter heading level 3, then I have a figure in the next section under chapter heading level 1. When I select chapter heading numbering for header 1, all the other figures in my document go to that level instead of maintaining their specific level…help?
I am trying to use mailmerge to print tickets. I tried using a column of sequential numbers on a spreadsheet and inserting that as a field into the mailmerge, but oddly, it used number 8 eight times on the first page, number 16 eight times on the second page, etc. So, I tried using a sequencing field as you describe. It worked great for the first page (numbers 1-8) but when I completed the mailmerge, it repeated numbers 1-8 on each successive sheet. What do I have to do to make this work in a mailmerge?
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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