I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Word templates are wonderful things. Microsoft, and hundreds of other people, have created some great free templates for almost everything. With these free templates you can make meeting agendas The 15 Best Meeting Agenda Templates for Microsoft Word The 15 Best Meeting Agenda Templates for Microsoft Word These meeting agenda templates for Microsoft Word can get you off to a great start for any type of meeting. Read More , beautiful flowcharts How to Create Stunning Flowcharts With Microsoft Word How to Create Stunning Flowcharts With Microsoft Word Used with imagination, flowcharts can simplify both your work or life. Why not try out a few flowcharts with one of the easiest tools on hand – Microsoft Word. Read More , professional resumes How to Create a Resume Template with Microsoft Word How to Create a Resume Template with Microsoft Word Your resume could be the difference between interviewing for the job of your dreams or never hearing back from the employer — use these tips to make sure it's the best it can be. Read More , and custom calendars 10+ Sites to Find the Perfect Free Printable Calendar Template All Year Long 10+ Sites to Find the Perfect Free Printable Calendar Template All Year Long You can never have enough reminders that your most valuable personal resource is limited. Our selection of printable weekly, monthly, and yearly calendars will help you manage your time wisely. Read More in minutes. A custom calendar might be a good fundraiser, too!

If you are still reading this then perhaps you are looking for a simple and reliable way to number a couple of lists in a Word document. If you read John's article then you have already been informed that field numbering is simple and robust. If you are like 9 out of 10 Word users in my office then anything more than 1. space space Blah, blah "enter" 2. space space Blah, blah ... defies simple! If that applies to you, then the "SeqField Numbering" Add-In presented later in this page is for you.
Hi Scott, I had a question regarding the sequential numbering Apex example…I am looking to automatically restart the sequence every month, which is not a problem using your example (i.e. changing the year to month in the expression). However, I would also like to add in a condition for year, so that the sequence restarts for each month of each year (i.e. my problem is for example that Feb 2011 last sequence number is 5, and then in Feb 2012 this becomes 6, where I would like it to be 1). I am wondering what the syntax would be. Thanks in advance, Lawn.
A quick way to create a bulleted or numbered list is to type the list, select it, and then click the Bulleted List or Numbered List button in the Control panel. These buttons let you turn the list on or off and switch between bullets and numbers. You can also make bullets and numbering part of a paragraph style and construct lists by assigning styles to paragraphs.
Does anybody have a way of formatting the phone numbers in Outlook 2003 so that they appear as xxx yyy zzzz that is no dashes, no parentheses? If I am going to synch to my PDA I want the numbers as short as possible and, to me, as readable as possible. Steve No. Masking of phone numbers is hard coded and based on your default dialing location. -- Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook] "Steve E." wrote in message news:2dd601c48eb8$3ff4a1e0$a601280a@phx.gbl... > Does anybody have a way of formatting the phone numbers in > Outlook 2003 so that they appear as x...
As more highways were built, states and countries began to experiment with distance-based (mile-based or kilometer-based) exit numbers. The first mile-based system known was implemented on the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey in the late 1950s. Michigan also implemented mile-based junction numbers on Interstate 94 in the 1960s. In this system, the number of miles from the beginning of the highway to the exit is used for the exit number. If two exits would end up with the same number, the numbers are sometimes modified slightly; this is often impossible and exits are given sequential or directional suffixes, just as with sequential numbers.
Using the instructions in #5, add an incrementing SEQ field. You can highlight any of them, except the reset field. For step 7, enter n}. n is the default switch that inserts the next number in the sequence, making it easy to remember. You don't have to specify the \n switch, because it's the default, but you can add it if it helps document your choice.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.
Even worse (I found out from bitter experience), is that whenever a computer “glitch” (aka “crash”) or “upgrade” (e.g. to a new/different desktop) came along, and our outside IT vendor had to “fix” the “computer” or “system,” (always, of course, at unexpected and unpredictable times), all of my “Auto Text” blocks got “wiped out” (or, I could not find them, even after a few help desk calls), and I had to “reinvent” and “re-keystroke” or “re-save” each of them again (and several times, again). Obviously, frustrating, and largely defeating the efficiency purpose.
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
An alternative to writing the domain of a sequence in the subscript is to indicate the range of values that the index can take by listing its highest and lowest legal values. For example, the notation {\displaystyle (k^{2})_{k=1}^{10}} denotes the ten-term sequence of squares {\displaystyle (1,4,9,...,100)} . The limits {\displaystyle \infty } and {\displaystyle -\infty } are allowed, but they do not represent valid values for the index, only the supremum or infimum of such values, respectively. For example, the sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n=1}^{\infty }} is the same as the sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} , and does not contain an additional term "at infinity". The sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n=-\infty }^{\infty }} is a bi-infinite sequence, and can also be written as {\displaystyle (...,a_{-1},a_{0},a_{1},a_{2},...)} .
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
If {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of complex numbers rather than a sequence of real numbers, this last formula can still be used to define convergence, with the provision that {\displaystyle |\cdot |} denotes the complex modulus, i.e. {\displaystyle |z|={\sqrt {z^{*}z}}} . If {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of points in a metric space, then the formula can be used to define convergence, if the expression {\displaystyle |a_{n}-L|} is replaced by the expression {\displaystyle {\text{dist}}(a_{n},L)} , which denotes the distance between {\displaystyle a_{n}} and {\displaystyle L} .

When I want to add page numbers, I only get a number on page One (or on whatever page I'm on) and nowhere else. I tried everything. When I go to Page Number Setting and change it to start at page 2 and want to add page numbers to all pages, nothing happens if I stand on page 1, or I get a number on whatever page I'm on. But only there. Am I supposed to do all pages one by one?
Hello! I would like to chart varying salaries against specific Low, middle and high numbers. Any suggestions on how to show this? Example: Salary 1 10000 Salary 2 12000 Salary 3 16000 Low 9000 Mid 15000 High 19000 THANK YOU! Do you want the Low-Mid-High values to be like a benchmark to measure salaries against? You could put horizontal lines across your chart, and use markers for the salary data. Here' a few ways to get your lines: http://peltiertech.com/Excel/Charts/AddLine.html - Jon ------- Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP Peltier Technical Services Tutorials... sequential numbering
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