An exit can be numbered by where the exit in the direction of increased mileage leaves the freeway, or by where the road that the exit serves crosses the freeway (which is occasionally ambiguous). From this number, the integer exit number can be determined by rounding up, rounding down, or rounding to the nearest integer. Many jurisdictions prefer to avoid an exit 0.[citation needed] To this end, the numbers are either rounded up to get the exit number, or any exit that would get the number 0 is instead numbered 1. Examples of highways with an exit 0 are British Columbia Highway 1 on the mainland, Interstate 70 in Wheeling, West Virginia along the West Virginia–Ohio border, and Interstate 90 on the Montana side of the Idaho–Montana border.
English Spanish Dictionary | English Italian Dictionary | English German Dictionary | English Portuguese Dictionary | English Russian Dictionary | Medical dictionary English French | Computer dictionary English French | Computer dictionary English Spanish | Business dictionary English French | English Arabic Dictionary | English Hebrew Dictionary | English Dutch Dictionary | English Polish Dictionary
I’d like to use this for Exhibits/Appedices. If we refer to the same Exhibit # in a footnote or elsewhere in the document, and then the Exhibit reference is moved, it causes an error in the footnote or reference. Is there a way to cross-reference this, or to have it cross-reference automatically? Lawyers want to use this but I can’t see them bothering to cross-reference the footnotes. Thanks.
you'd need to use a before save macro. Something like the macro at the end - but it would run on every save, which may not be what you want. I use a macro that gets the invoice # and saves (it does several things). I added a button to the ribbon that calls a macro that runs several macros: Sub FinalizeInvoice() CreateInvoiceNumber CopyToExcel FinalCleanup ' this does the save End Sub This is an automated macro - but it will run every time the file is saved. Private WithEvents App As Word.Application Private Sub Document_Open() Set App = Word.Application… Read more »
However, what I want it to do now, instead of just putting the number into the attribute value, I want the number to be a suffix to the existing default tag value of the tag named "ID" which is "ADDRESS:" for some blocks and "ELEVATION:" for other blocks but the tag name that the routine always has to filter for is "ID". That way the user can pick anywhere on the block - not being forced to pick the tag we want to add numbers to.

A quick search at the top using the term “document numbering” shows 46 different threads, with very good advice, for the most part.  I would first recommend you perform the same search and see what advice may be gleaned from those far older and wiser than myself.  In order to directly answer your question, I would refer you to the following discussion thread.  Many talk about the physical numbering system to use, which is important, and many discuss the frustration that a new person to the position feels when they inherit a mess from someone else and wish to clean it up. 
    Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.
I’d like to use this for Exhibits/Appedices. If we refer to the same Exhibit # in a footnote or elsewhere in the document, and then the Exhibit reference is moved, it causes an error in the footnote or reference. Is there a way to cross-reference this, or to have it cross-reference automatically? Lawyers want to use this but I can’t see them bothering to cross-reference the footnotes. Thanks.

LION also carries a heavy-duty, 6 wheel automatic numbering machine with rubber faced wheels. The rubber wheels work great for metal marking and plastic marking when used with LION fast dry ink. As with the other LION numbering machines, this machine is made in Japan with precision crafted one-piece hardened steel frame with all metal interior construction. LION machines will provide years of reliable use. Ideal for sequential numbering operations to use as a date and number stamp, serial number stamp, an inspection stamp and etc. sequential numbering in publisher
×