Here, the field code SEQ is the winning choice. SEQ is a sequence numbering code often used for things like figures or illustrations (think “Figure 1”). What makes it an ideal choice here is the ability to name each sequence separately. In other words, we can define one numbering sequence for interrogatories, another one for requests for production, and a third one for requests for admission. Microsoft Word will be able to keep each numbering sequence separate because each will have a distinct name.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.

Storage/saving (by default) (I understand) was to “normal.dot” somewhere on “my” C:/drive. (I.e. Nobody else in the office could “get” to the effort. So, I (as attorney), and each secretary, lawyer, and paralegal, had to work in their own “silo” and “reinvent” any such Auto Text blocks). [I.e. Query – Is there any way to save a consistent set of such Auto Text blocks for MS Word to a shared “network” drive, or similar, in a law office?).
You could set up a new label (‘ES’) on the Caption dialog box and use that for your ES tables. You’d also have to add a new List of Tables to your document, selecting ‘ES’ from the ‘Caption Label’ list. However, if you just use ‘ES’, then you would only have one sequence for both figs and tables in the Exec Summary. If you needed two separate sequences, then I suggest you create two labels — ‘ES Table’ and ‘ES Figure’.

Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.

Version control is one of the most critical elements of a document management system because it ensure users always have access to the most current version of a company document. This feature alone can cost justify the implementation of a document management system as it eliminates duplication of work and allows users to share the most current information on matters such as company policies or contracts.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.
To recap, you use a DMax function to return the highest number in the Sequence and increment it by 1. You assign the incremented number to a control on your form and then immediately save the record. If your identifier includes additional information from the record, you use an expression that concatenates that information with the sequence number to display the full identifier.
Some non-freeways use exit numbers. Typically these are rural roads built to expressway standards[citation needed], and either only the actual exits are numbered, or the at-grade intersections are also numbered. An extreme case of this is in New York City, where the Grand Concourse and Linden Boulevard were given sequential numbers, one per intersection (both boulevards no longer have exit numbers as of 2011). A milder version of this has been recently used on the West Side Highway, also in New York, where only the major intersections are numbered (possibly to match the planned exits on the cancelled Westway freeway). Another case is the Nanaimo Parkway in Nanaimo, British Columbia carrying Highway 19, where all exits are numbered though all except one are at-grade intersections. Some other intersections on Highway 19 outside Nanaimo are also given numbers.
I have done this twice now, getting flustered. The ticket part the person keeps has the correct sequential number on it, but the side that we keep has the same number on it for the whole page. What part am I missing, at first I did not uncheck the box, but this time I did but have the same number on the stub side that we keep with the person’s name, etc
Storage/saving (by default) (I understand) was to “normal.dot” somewhere on “my” C:/drive. (I.e. Nobody else in the office could “get” to the effort. So, I (as attorney), and each secretary, lawyer, and paralegal, had to work in their own “silo” and “reinvent” any such Auto Text blocks). [I.e. Query – Is there any way to save a consistent set of such Auto Text blocks for MS Word to a shared “network” drive, or similar, in a law office?).
If you make a list of things you need to do, starting with number 1 and continuing until all your tasks are accounted for, then you’ve made a sequential list. Something that is sequential often follows a numerical or alphabetical order, but it can also describe things that aren’t numbered but still need to take place in a logical order, such as the sequential steps you follow for running a program on your computer.
Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word's numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you'll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.
×