Thank you very much for this very useful information. May I ask how I can stop the whole document captions from being updated to the same numbering style? The problem is some of my figures are under a level 2 heading and some under a level 4 heading etc. I want to be able to have for example figure 1.1-1 as well as figure 2.3.1-1. Thank you very much.
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A sequence is said to be monotonically increasing, if each term is greater than or equal to the one before it. For example, the sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n=1}^{\infty }} is monotonically increasing if and only if an+1 {\displaystyle \geq } an for all n ∈ N. If each consecutive term is strictly greater than (>) the previous term then the sequence is called strictly monotonically increasing. A sequence is monotonically decreasing, if each consecutive term is less than or equal to the previous one, and strictly monotonically decreasing, if each is strictly less than the previous. If a sequence is either increasing or decreasing it is called a monotone sequence. This is a special case of the more general notion of a monotonic function.


Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer. :-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed.
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel. I then let InDesign CS4 do the merging. Here’s the formula.

To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

For years, I've applied an autonumbered style to the first cell I want to be sequentially numbered. When I add rows, the cells immediately below continue that same numbered style whether I add them by tabbing from the end of the last row or by using the commands to inserts rows above or below. Because the numbering is part of a style, it can continue from one table to another, but it can always be restarted. I can even skip a row by changing the style for the particular cell or by just toggling off the numbering. I also use it to show two levels of numbering in a single cell by creating two autonumbered styles in a hierarchy that works just like Heading 1 and Heading 2.
For example, (M, A, R, Y) is a sequence of letters with the letter 'M' first and 'Y' last. This sequence differs from (A, R, M, Y). Also, the sequence (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8), which contains the number 1 at two different positions, is a valid sequence. Sequences can be finite, as in these examples, or infinite, such as the sequence of all even positive integers (2, 4, 6, ...). In computing and computer science, finite sequences are sometimes called strings, words or lists, the different names commonly corresponding to different ways to represent them in computer memory; infinite sequences are called streams. The empty sequence ( ) is included in most notions of sequence, but may be excluded depending on the context.

You can change the numbers in the list by restarting the sequence or by specifying a new start number. You can change the list's style. You can do anything to this list that you can do to a normal numbered list because it is a numbered list, with one exception: the list, while easy to format, is fixed. If you delete an item, the list updates accordingly, but I haven't found a way to add numbers.
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Automata or finite state machines can typically be thought of as directed graphs, with edges labeled using some specific alphabet, Σ. Most familiar types of automata transition from state to state by reading input letters from Σ, following edges with matching labels; the ordered input for such an automaton forms a sequence called a word (or input word). The sequence of states encountered by the automaton when processing a word is called a run. A nondeterministic automaton may have unlabeled or duplicate out-edges for any state, giving more than one successor for some input letter. This is typically thought of as producing multiple possible runs for a given word, each being a sequence of single states, rather than producing a single run that is a sequence of sets of states; however, 'run' is occasionally used to mean the latter.

LION also carries a heavy-duty, 6 wheel automatic numbering machine with rubber faced wheels. The rubber wheels work great for metal marking and plastic marking when used with LION fast dry ink. As with the other LION numbering machines, this machine is made in Japan with precision crafted one-piece hardened steel frame with all metal interior construction. LION machines will provide years of reliable use. Ideal for sequential numbering operations to use as a date and number stamp, serial number stamp, an inspection stamp and etc.
Other notations can be useful for sequences whose pattern cannot be easily guessed, or for sequences that do not have a pattern such as the digits of π. One such notation is to write down a general formula for computing the nth term as a function of n, enclose it in parentheses, and include a subscript indicating the range of values that n can take. For example, in this notation the sequence of even numbers could be written as {\displaystyle (2n)_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The sequence of squares could be written as {\displaystyle (n^{2})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The variable n is called an index, and the set of values that it can take is called the index set.

Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
InDesign allows you to add a page number marker to a master page within the document. The master page functions as a template for every page it's applied to, so the consecutive page numbers appear on every page. InDesign updates the page number automatically as you insert, delete and move pages. To add a page number marker to a master page, create a text box on the master page by going to the Type menu and choosing "Insert Special Character," "Markers" and then "Current Page Number."
If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.

To define a sequence by recursion, one needs a rule to construct each element in terms of the ones before it. In addition, enough initial elements must be provided so that all subsequent elements of the sequence can be computed by the rule. The principle of mathematical induction can be used to prove that in this case, there is exactly one sequence that satisfies both the recursion rule and the initial conditions. Induction can also be used to prove properties about a sequence, especially for sequences whose most natural description is recursive.


With this expression we check only for records that are in the same year as the Inquiry date to increment the sequence. Again, the NZ function will automatically restart the sequence with each year. Cleary, though, we cannot generate this number until the InquiryDate has been entered. Is this value is a user entry, then you may want to check that it’s filled in before generating the number. Something like:
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the number of copies each time I print? Hi you could record a macro while doing this manually and assign a shortcut or button to this recorded macro -- Regards Frank Kabel Frankfurt, Germany Hebert45 wrote: > I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. > Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the > number of copies each time I print? ...
- [Instructor] In this week's Word tip I'd like to address a question I'm often asked by people working in tables here in Microsoft Word and that is is there a way to quickly have numbers automatically fill up cells in the table much like they might in Microsoft Excel when you have incremental numbers that need to appear by simple clicking and dragging the corner of a cell. Well, yes, it can be done here in the table in Microsoft Word. It's not done the same way but it is just as easy and we're going to do it with this file, LeafAndMortar Inventory 040. If you have the exercise files, open it up. Now, if you don't have the exercise files, just use one of your own tables. All you need is an empty column. You can see here on page one we do have a table for garden tools and inventory and we need to number these and instead going into each cell and typing in a new number that increments by one, we're going to use a trick to have it automatically fill up that way. On page two of this document you can see there's a second table for hardscaping tools, so we want to differentiate these numbers, so we might want, for example, hardscaping tools, their item numbers to start with the letters HT whereas the garden tools up above might need to start with GT and then the number. Keep that in mind as we now go to the column where we want the numbers to appear. All you need to do is select the entire column. In this case we have a header column with a label in there, item number, so we're not going to use the trick of going to the top and clicking when that arrow appears, instead we're going to select the cells where the numbers need to go. With them selected, now we'll go to the ribbon. With the Home tab selected, go to the Paragraph group and just go to the Numbering dropdown arrow. Don't click the numbering button, that's going to add the default number but click the dropdown. You'll see the different numbering options that are already in the numbering library. You can hover over those to see what it's going to look like. You can see the numbers incrementing by one with a period or with brackets. We could use Roman numerals, even lettering here but if we want our own numbers, we go down a little bit further and click Define New Number. Give that a click. You should see the number style one, two, three selected. Click that dropdown and if you wanted to use something other than one, two, three, like Roman numerals or letters, they're there as well but we do want to start with just plain old numbers one, two, three. And you can see what shows up down below. The number format is the number and then a period and we see a sample of what that's going to look like down below. Well, the first thing we can do is click in that field just to the right of the period and hit your backspace key to take it out, we don't need the period. Now, we can move over to the left side of the number by using the left cursor key or you can click if you want just in front of the one and here's where we can add things like letters. GT, for example, then a dash and if that's all we need, we'll see GT-1, two, three etc. all the way down the column. Maybe you'd like to add zeros in there, like 01, 02 etc. You can do that as well. Once you have exactly what you want, simply click OK and it's done and by the way, that number format is there going forward, so the next time you want to use it, it's going to show up in your numbering library in the document as a number format and if it's one you've recently used, it shows up on this list as well, so you can choose it any time you like. Just click in the background and close that up, click outside the table to deselect everything to see how easy that was to get incremental numbers that start with letters and a dash. Now, scroll down to the table on the second page. Now that you know how to do this, you're going to create your own number style that starts with HT, a dash, perhaps a zero and then incremental numbers by following those same steps on this table. That's your homework knowing what you know after this week's Word tip.

I’m quite inclined to let the printer add the numbers. Less file size for me, less plates for me. I recently sent an invite to a digital printers, I offered to lay it up with all the names, they rejected the idea and said they could merge the names in as it printed. I guess it’s down to what you’re going to use it for. But if you’re going to print them yourself then by all means, if it’s going to a printer, best to check with them before you send anything definite over.

i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
Standard sizes for NCR forms are half page (5.5″ x 8.5″), full page (8.5″ x 11″) and legal (8.5″ x 14″) although custom sizes can be ordered to meet your specific need. The design orientation can be either vertical or horizontal. The link below gives you access to design templates that can be used to lay out your form in the appropriate size and orientation.
If the sequence of real numbers (an) is such that all the terms are less than some real number M, then the sequence is said to be bounded from above. In other words, this means that there exists M such that for all n, an ≤ M. Any such M is called an upper bound. Likewise, if, for some real m, an ≥ m for all n greater than some N, then the sequence is bounded from below and any such m is called a lower bound. If a sequence is both bounded from above and bounded from below, then the sequence is said to be bounded.

I tossed back a rather glib answer about using the AutoNumLgl field code to number the discovery requests, and she threw in this little wrinkle: her attorneys like to play mix-and-match with their discovery. In other words, they may put in a couple of interrogatories, then throw in a related request for production, then another interrogatory, then a request for admission that’s related to that interrogatory.

I'm using Column A of a spreadsheet to number some items in Column B. I've been using Excel's automatic series-filling function, where you drag down from the lower right corner of a cell. However, since some of the rows in Column B are empty, and I don't want them numbered, I have to stop numbering and manually "jump" over the blanks in Column A. Is there a way to automatically number down in Column A, while skipping over the blanks and continuing where I left off? I.e. 1 2 3 4 5 ? Thanks much. Try this in A1: =IF(B1<>"",COUNTA($B$1:B1),"...


Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
Other examples of sequences include ones made up of rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers. The sequence (.9, .99, .999, .9999, ...) approaches the number 1. In fact, every real number can be written as the limit of a sequence of rational numbers, e.g. via its decimal expansion. For instance, π is the limit of the sequence (3, 3.1, 3.14, 3.141, 3.1415, ...). A related sequence is the sequence of decimal digits of π, i.e. (3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, ...). This sequence does not have any pattern that is easily discernible by eye, unlike the preceding sequence, which is increasing.
You may wonder whether typing 1, 2, and 3 would be easier than using the ListNum field. Although doing that may be easier initially, the value of using the ListNum field becomes apparent when you cut and paste. When a paragraph contains multiple numbered items that you move or delete, Word automatically updates the ListNum fields. Using ListNum fields assures you of accurate numbering within a paragraph throughout the document.
Thank you very much for your prompt reply dear Rhonda. I actually managed to do this somehow. I right-clicked on the caption and clicked edit filed and then field codes. In the code I changed the number showing the heading level, e.g. \s 1, \s 2, \s 3. When I changed the caption heading level in this manner, I noticed that the changed was applied to only that caption and not the rest of the document. So now I have different heading levels in my figure captions. It did the trick for me. Thank you so much and Happy New Year :)

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Hi Jason! Hard to say when I’m not sure which part isn’t working for you. If the numbering isn’t continuing across separate frames, you need to make sure you’re using a list. If they are in the wrong order, remember it uses the paste/creation order to number them. If neither of those fix it, let me know what specific issue you’re having. Good luck!

To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.


I am having trouble with this procedure. My situation is almost identical to example #2. I want to populate RecordNumber on my form with a date number like “130001, 130002, etc.” where “13” is the year based on a date automatically generated in the OpenDate field in tblLogRecords. OpenDate is a date/time type field that has a default value of the date the record is created and is not editable. I have added a field called Sequence to tblLogRecords and it is a Number, Long Integer type. I also created a bound control for Sequence on my form. I have a completely separate autonumber field as the PK.

In mathematics, a sequence is an enumerated collection of objects in which repetitions are allowed. Like a set, it contains members (also called elements, or terms). The number of elements (possibly infinite) is called the length of the sequence. Unlike a set, the same elements can appear multiple times at different positions in a sequence, and order matters. Formally, a sequence can be defined as a function whose domain is either the set of the natural numbers (for infinite sequences) or the set of the first n natural numbers (for a sequence of finite length n). The position of an element in a sequence is its rank or index; it is the natural number from which the element is the image. It depends on the context or a specific convention, if the first element has index 0 or 1. When a symbol has been chosen for denoting a sequence, the nth element of the sequence is denoted by this symbol with n as subscript; for example, the nth element of the Fibonacci sequence is generally denoted Fn.

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