Add specific codes to coupons to track customer responses     Use different codes for your different marketing messages, advertisements, or promotions. These codes will enable you to keep track of how customers learned about your offer. The more you learn about who is drawn to your business and what attracts customers' attention, the better you can focus future marketing efforts.

NCR (no carbon required) or carbonless forms, like the name suggests, have eliminated the need for carbon paper between sheets to create multiple copies of the same form. The paper is chemically treated to transfer the impression from the first page to the subsequent pages with very little pressure. This works because the bottom side of carbonless NCR paper is coated with micro-encapsulated dye that breaks when pressed. The top of the susequent sheet is coated with clay that reacts with the dye to form a permanent mark. When the top sheet is written on, the pressure causes the micro-capsules to break and release the dye onto the page beneath it.
You could stop there and just copy those little bits of text all through your document. But no, we want to make this really, really easy! So we’re going to set up some AutoText entries. What that’s going to do for you (if you’re using Microsoft Word 2010 or above — if you use version 2007, see below for some caveats) is allow you to type the first four letters of your SEQ name and have Word offer to complete the phrase for you, complete with the incrementing number courtesy of the sequence field code we set up earlier.
If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.

You can define a section prefix to label section pages automatically. For example, if you specify A– for Section Prefix on page 16 of a document and include the section prefix, the page will appear in the table of contents or index as A–16. Text you type for a section marker appears when you choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Section Marker.

The sequential numbers required for the stationery are typically prepared in a spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel and then exported as a txt or csv file for use with the Data Merge palette. However, a free script called Indys Number Generator written by Stanislav Antos can create sequential numbers without having to open any spreadsheet software. The script has been available for some time but I feel it is a hidden gem and definitely worth discussing.

Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.

First, you have to use YOUR field and control names. The ones I use are samples. The error you are getting indicated you do not have a control named txtProject. So you have to substitute the correct name of the control. bound to the ProjectID field. By the way it is not a good idea to the octothorpe(#) as part of a field name. A controlname may be different from a fieldname. The name property of a control is on the Other tab in the Properties dialog.
Scott, you’ll need to be more specific to help me. When you say “put this code behind a save button” what exactly does that mean – where do I type the code you provided? Yes, I do have a Save Button, which saves the record and closes the form (but currently has no way to save the next sequential Project ID). I want show this next Project ID (number on the entry form) and have that new number flow to the table along with the other data on the form.
The sequential numbers required for the stationery are typically prepared in a spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel and then exported as a txt or csv file for use with the Data Merge palette. However, a free script called Indys Number Generator written by Stanislav Antos can create sequential numbers without having to open any spreadsheet software. The script has been available for some time but I feel it is a hidden gem and definitely worth discussing.

I created something like this for a demo and didn't have to use a script. If I remember correctly, I leveraged Workflow. Essentially, the form submission would trigger a very simple workflow that would look at the current counter value on a database table and increment it by 1. The next form would then start with a lookup that would grab that counter and put it into a read-only (or hidden) field. Rinse and repeat.
LION Automatic Numbering Machines are the highest quality and the most durable stamps in the market at prices less than the competition. LION machines are precision crafted of one-piece hardened steel and finished in rugged, high-polish chrome. Ideal for sequential numbering operation to use as date and number stamp, serial number stamp, inspection stamp, etc. Customizing is also available so that it can work to your exact specifications. Made in Japan.
An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
Typically the second option of saving as a CSV file is the one to choose for use with Data Merge. Click the create button to choose a file name and location, make sure that a header has been assigned and click OK. This creates the CSV file that contains the sequential numbers that can then be used in a Data Merge by opening the Data Merge palette, clicking the flyout and clicking Select Data Source…
Most European countries use sequential numbering schemes. Spain uses distance-based numbering on its Autovias, but not on its Autopistas. Austria and the Czech Republic use distance-based schemes. A number of European countries (including the Netherlands, Belgium and France) do not number motorway intersections, apparently because one cannot "exit" the motorway there. Countries like Germany and Switzerland have attributed numbers to their exit, but instead of the usual exit symbol, they are given a specific interchange symbol.
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Some sequential exits are renumbered (remaining sequential) due to added exits. For instance, the Hutchinson River Parkway in New York was renumbered so that its northernmost exit, 27, became 30. However, the Merritt Parkway, which continued the Hutchinson's exit numbers in Connecticut, was not renumbered. This means the Route 120A interchange is numbered 27 in Connecticut and 30 in New York.
Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
If you make a list of things you need to do, starting with number 1 and continuing until all your tasks are accounted for, then you’ve made a sequential list. Something that is sequential often follows a numerical or alphabetical order, but it can also describe things that aren’t numbered but still need to take place in a logical order, such as the sequential steps you follow for running a program on your computer.
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