I used multi-level lists for this sort of thing. When defining my list, I type “Interrogatory No.” before the number field in the number format definition, link it to a list style, 2nd level I type “Request for Production No”, link it to another list style. I’ll use “Answer” with no number as another level of the list. Then I modify the linked styles so the paragraphs are formatted how I need. In the styles linked to request for production and interrogatories, I will use the style linked to “Answer” as the style for the following paragraph. In the “answer” style, I’ll use Interrogatory as the style for following paragraph.
Design your ticket, use excel or libre's version and create the numbers. Save those numbers as text, I always make the first one xxx then 001 and so on, xxx will be the master page. Use data merge from Indesign to create the master ticket, you will need to make a text box for the number. Once it looks good to you draw a text box around the whole ticket. At the bottom of the data merge tab is a button that gives you the options how you want your layout, columns or rows, etc. even has a preview. once you click create it will create another file with all your tickets sequentially numbered. It'll be a couple of hours before I'm at work but can post the link I used to create these for the first couple of times.

To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.

Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.


when I assign a heading level to a figure, all the other figures at different heading levels change to the level I assigned the new figure. ie, I have a figure under chapter heading level 3, then I have a figure in the next section under chapter heading level 1. When I select chapter heading numbering for header 1, all the other figures in my document go to that level instead of maintaining their specific level…help?
To create a running list—a list that is interrupted by other paragraphs or that spans multiple stories or documents—create a paragraph style and apply the style to paragraphs that you want to be part of the list. For example, to create a running list of the tables in your document, create a paragraph style called Tables, make a defined list part of the style, and then apply the Tables paragraph style to all paragraphs you want in your Table list.
So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.

The new SQL stored procedure lookup rules in Forms 9.1 make doing something like this possible. The example in the online help shows how to use a stored procedure to auto-append an incrementing number from the database to a form when it loads, which might solve some of your problems. However, the number is incremented after the form loads (not when it is submitted), so that might not exactly fit your needs. Here's the link to the correct page of the online help.
Numbers works in a fashion somewhat different from traditional spreadsheets like Microsoft Excel or Lotus 1-2-3. In the traditional model, the table is the first-class citizen of the system, acting as both the primary interface for work, as well as the container for other types of media like charts or digital images. In effect, the spreadsheet and the table are one and the same. In contrast, Numbers uses a separate “canvas” as its basic container object, and tables are among the many objects that can be placed within the canvas.[4][N 1]
Even worse (I found out from bitter experience), is that whenever a computer “glitch” (aka “crash”) or “upgrade” (e.g. to a new/different desktop) came along, and our outside IT vendor had to “fix” the “computer” or “system,” (always, of course, at unexpected and unpredictable times), all of my “Auto Text” blocks got “wiped out” (or, I could not find them, even after a few help desk calls), and I had to “reinvent” and “re-keystroke” or “re-save” each of them again (and several times, again). Obviously, frustrating, and largely defeating the efficiency purpose.
There are many types of machines printers used to number Carbonless forms. One style is a letter press, another is a pneumatic numbering head which uses air pressure do drive a numbering head and crash imprint the number on the top sheet transferring the number to the other sheets. For example, if you were numbering a 2 part carbonless form you would have a black or red number on the top sheet and a crashed number on the second sheet. The image on the second sheet would appear black no matter what ink was on the top sheet as the carbonless paper transfers the image in black.
If {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of complex numbers rather than a sequence of real numbers, this last formula can still be used to define convergence, with the provision that {\displaystyle |\cdot |} denotes the complex modulus, i.e. {\displaystyle |z|={\sqrt {z^{*}z}}} . If {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of points in a metric space, then the formula can be used to define convergence, if the expression {\displaystyle |a_{n}-L|} is replaced by the expression {\displaystyle {\text{dist}}(a_{n},L)} , which denotes the distance between {\displaystyle a_{n}} and {\displaystyle L} .
Numbers has been well received in the press, notably for its text-based formulas, clean looks and ease-of-use.[17][18][19] Macworld has given it high marks, especially newer versions, awarding Numbers ’09 four mice out of five. They did point out a number of common issues, especially problems exporting to Excel and the inability to “lock” cells to prevent them moving when the table is scrolled.[14] Numbers for the iPhone and iPad have received similar favorable reviews.[20]
Erica Gamet has been involved in the graphics industry for an unbelievable 30 years! She is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other print- and production-related topics. She is a regular presence at CreativePro Week’s PePcon and InDesign Conferences, and has spoken at ebookcraft in Canada and Making Design in Norway. You can find Erica’s online tutorials at CreativeLive and through her YouTube channel. When she isn’t at her computer, she can be found exploring her new homebase of Seattle and the greater Pacific Northwest.
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher. sequential numbering in word
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