Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer. :-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed.
In mathematics, a sequence is an enumerated collection of objects in which repetitions are allowed. Like a set, it contains members (also called elements, or terms). The number of elements (possibly infinite) is called the length of the sequence. Unlike a set, the same elements can appear multiple times at different positions in a sequence, and order matters. Formally, a sequence can be defined as a function whose domain is either the set of the natural numbers (for infinite sequences) or the set of the first n natural numbers (for a sequence of finite length n). The position of an element in a sequence is its rank or index; it is the natural number from which the element is the image. It depends on the context or a specific convention, if the first element has index 0 or 1. When a symbol has been chosen for denoting a sequence, the nth element of the sequence is denoted by this symbol with n as subscript; for example, the nth element of the Fibonacci sequence is generally denoted Fn.
All I want to know is, how do you link fields, like {SEQ}, to a style – so that if I select/apply style “Figure Caption” (my style, I also have “Table Caption”), I get not just the attributes of the style (what it looks like, where it is on the page etc.) but I get a chapter (or section) number + a sequence number added, (e.g. “2-3”). I know about STYLEREF and SEQ Figure # and/or calling a section number (if required) – but I can’t find out how to take the simple and to me obvious step to have sequential numbering (prefixed with either “Figure” or “Table”) attached to my Figure Caption style. It all seems to be a two-step process: (i) select the style, (ii) select the numbering. I want to do both at style level. I want to see/get (e.g.) “Figure 2-3: Linking figure numbering to styles” just by applying my “Figure Caption” style to my figure caption text “Linking figure numbering to styles”. Please, only tell me how to do that, how to link chapter/sequence numbering via a style – i.e. in just one step – applying the style.

Word includes a special sequencing field that you can use to do all sorts of numbering. You can even use the SEQ field to help create broken numbered lists. (A broken numbered list is one in which the flow of the list is interrupted by paragraphs of a different format.) This approach to creating numbered lists is particularly helpful and much less prone to the problems inherent in Word's built-in list numbering. For the purposes of this tip, the format of the sequence field is as follows:
Rhonda, Thank you for your amazingly quick and thorough reply! You are correct, Word does the Table and Figure numbering splendidly. I was trying to reference those numbers in the text, which I see is a function done quite well in Word using Cross Reference: ‘In Word 2007 and 2010: Display the References tab. In the Captions group, click on the Cross-reference button.’ Thanks again, Joshua.
Here, the field code SEQ is the winning choice. SEQ is a sequence numbering code often used for things like figures or illustrations (think “Figure 1”). What makes it an ideal choice here is the ability to name each sequence separately. In other words, we can define one numbering sequence for interrogatories, another one for requests for production, and a third one for requests for admission. Microsoft Word will be able to keep each numbering sequence separate because each will have a distinct name.

NCR (no carbon required) or carbonless forms, like the name suggests, have eliminated the need for carbon paper between sheets to create multiple copies of the same form. The paper is chemically treated to transfer the impression from the first page to the subsequent pages with very little pressure. This works because the bottom side of carbonless NCR paper is coated with micro-encapsulated dye that breaks when pressed. The top of the susequent sheet is coated with clay that reacts with the dye to form a permanent mark. When the top sheet is written on, the pressure causes the micro-capsules to break and release the dye onto the page beneath it.
I use a template for all my drawings that includes a page number in the lower right hand corner (usually says "Page 1 of 4" for example). I usually edit this number manually, which is fine for documents with a small amount of pages, but if I'm working on a large document (50+ pages) and need to re-order some pages it means editing the page number on every page manually.
A sequence space is a vector space whose elements are infinite sequences of real or complex numbers. Equivalently, it is a function space whose elements are functions from the natural numbers to the field K, where K is either the field of real numbers or the field of complex numbers. The set of all such functions is naturally identified with the set of all possible infinite sequences with elements in K, and can be turned into a vector space under the operations of pointwise addition of functions and pointwise scalar multiplication. All sequence spaces are linear subspaces of this space. Sequence spaces are typically equipped with a norm, or at least the structure of a topological vector space.
I know that I can select all of the clips and then move the play head to approx 1/10 of a second and split the clips. This works except I have to go through and manually delete the bits I don't want which is tedious enough for a video with 82 images but I am planning on longer projects, doing it manually would be a nightmare. Also I could probably re-order the images manually but I am sure that there must be an easier.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
Word includes a special sequencing field that you can use to do all sorts of numbering. You can even use the SEQ field to help create broken numbered lists. (A broken numbered list is one in which the flow of the list is interrupted by paragraphs of a different format.) This approach to creating numbered lists is particularly helpful and much less prone to the problems inherent in Word's built-in list numbering. For the purposes of this tip, the format of the sequence field is as follows:
If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.

A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.
Become a Microsoft Word power user in just a few minutes a week. This tips-based series helps you deepen your proficiency with Word, covering a variety of tools and techniques you can use. Learn how to work with templates, format documents, customize built-in styles and themes, master Track Changes, and more. Check back each week for a new pro tip from expert David Rivers.
With this expression we check only for records that are in the same year as the Inquiry date to increment the sequence. Again, the NZ function will automatically restart the sequence with each year. Cleary, though, we cannot generate this number until the InquiryDate has been entered. Is this value is a user entry, then you may want to check that it’s filled in before generating the number. Something like:

we have printed AP checks using the check number from 0000000001 to 0000000006, but we havent posted those batches. we have only one checbook. Now can we restart the check number from 000001. Then do we need to delete the previous batches for checks printed. What is the best approach in this regard. Thanks in Advance, Arun. In the Post Payables Checks batch window (Transactions > Purchasing > Post Checks), choose the batch in question, then select Reprint Checks from the drop-down list. Enter 000001 for your starting check number. You will also need to go ...
What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in Microsoft Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. "Mike C"  wrote in message news:BC4F1F10-A96C-4EC7-9E33-670828E53A0A@microsoft.com... > What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in > Microsoft > Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. Google or the online help would be your friend on this one. There's no fixed limit, there's only the limit on the overall size of the database file...

Version numbers allow people providing support to ascertain exactly which code a user is running, so that they can rule out bugs that have already been fixed as a cause of an issue, and the like. This is especially important when a program has a substantial user community, especially when that community is large enough that the people providing technical support are not the people who wrote the code. The semantic meaning[1] of version.revision.change style numbering is also important to information technology staff, who often use it to determine how much attention and research they need to pay to a new release before deploying it in their facility. As a rule of thumb, the bigger the changes, the larger the chances that something might break (although examining the Changelog, if any, may reveal only superficial or irrelevant changes). This is one reason for some of the distaste expressed in the “drop the major release” approach taken by Asterisk et alia: now, staff must (or at least should) do a full regression test for every update.
There are many types of machines printers used to number Carbonless forms. One style is a letter press, another is a pneumatic numbering head which uses air pressure do drive a numbering head and crash imprint the number on the top sheet transferring the number to the other sheets. For example, if you were numbering a 2 part carbonless form you would have a black or red number on the top sheet and a crashed number on the second sheet. The image on the second sheet would appear black no matter what ink was on the top sheet as the carbonless paper transfers the image in black.
Thanks for the quick reply, I think I’m a little confused by the Display aspect of this. Artifact ID is a primary key to the table I am working in and I need it to have a unique identifier that other people can search for. The previously adopted naming convention for this ID is that which I mentioned before, Collection Point ID plus a period and then a sequential number restarting at each new Collection Point ID i.e 2-1050.1, 2-1050.2, 2-1060.1 and so on. So I think I actually need to save this in the Artifact ID field. I realize this might be slightly redundant but I’m not sure how the display would work as far as searching for specific Artifact IDs in the future.
Yes, I have used this system in a multi-user setting. As noted, the key is to commit the record immediately after generating the sequence. However, if the application is one where there is very heavy transaction processing. In other words dozens of users creating records simultaneously, you might want to guard further against duplication. At the speeds computers process, it is not impossible that multiple users will grab the max value before it can be incremented and saved.
The Wine project formerly used a date versioning scheme, which uses the year followed by the month followed by the day of the release; for example, “Wine 20040505”. Ubuntu Linux uses a similar versioning scheme—Ubuntu 11.10, for example, was released October 2011. Some video games also use date as versioning, for example the arcade game Street Fighter EX. At startup it displays the version number as a date plus a region code, for example 961219 ASIA.
But we won’t be stopping at just using a field code to increment the numbers. I’m also going to show you how to save the text (“Interrogatory No.” etc.) that precedes each number as an AutoText entry. That means you’ll be able to type just four letters and hit the Enter key (those are the “5 keystrokes” promised above) and Word will finish the phrase for you, complete with the sequence code to increment the discovery request number for you.
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).
I thought I'd try and just create one decal and use the print merge feature but I don't print from my workstation. I create the design in X7 then export it to a RIP Station for print. I thought I'd just do the print merge and print as pdf just to get the numbers without typing them. That gets me all the numbers in sequence but all on 500 separate pages.
I have now permanently “baked” the Inline Counter system into my InDesign defaults. With no documents open, I made a “Counter” CharStyle and a “Zero Footnote” ParStyle, with those crucial zero-level type size attributes, and selected them in the Document Footnote Options. I also added a blank space as a prefix and a period and a blank space as a suffix. Then I made a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-F) for the Footnote/Counter. So now Inline Counters can be inserted anywhere and anytime with close to zero efforts.

Thank you for your prompt response, Deborah. However, I don’t believe I explained myself in the detail required. To reiterate: My autonumbering example is FORM INTERROGATORY NO. 1.1. The next interrogatory would be numbered 1.2, then 1.3, etc.–automatically and sequentially numbered. Next would be FORM INTERROGATORY NO. 2.1 (see example 1.1 above). Please understand that the interrogatory must be auto-numbered–both the 1 and the 1, both the 1 and the 2, etc.; both the 2 and the 1, both the 2 and the 2; both the 3 and the 1; both the 3 and the 2. That is my dilemma.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
Another issue with the part-numbering format is part number designation. Some systems associate a part number with a particular part type. For example, 10xxx indicates a procedure, 20xxx indicates a drawing, PLxxx indicates a policy-level document, and so on. An alternative approach to part numbering is a “no designation” system, where parts are given sequential unique numbers within a specified format, regardless of their type, material, application or other attributes. After all, isn’t the part title the best designator?
Hi, this is a great write up. I am very new to InDesign and i print onto a range of products and my first order with sequential numbering came up (serial numbers), I have the template made in illustrator and i also have the numbers added (00001 on all of the art work). A friend told me InDesign has a function for automatically incrasing the numbers by 1 for each art work. I have 105 pieces per template, is there a way to import the design and then sort the number (already text edible) and then save as a pdf then send to print?

My issue is trying to create small dot labels or equivalent to make up sequential alpha numeric labels to identify each individual item that I have in my shop, retrospectively. I have possibly 6-8thousand individual items that need coding for stock take purposes yet I can find no outlet that supply such thing. Do you have any suggestions. My line is antiques/collectables, predominantly china with items ranging in size from 2-3cm to 5/600cm. I would be most grateful for any solutions or suggestions. Best regards. Pete.
Ok, generating a random 3 digit number is a whole different thing, so I’m not going to go into that. If you want your numbers to start at 100 (to insure three digits) then change the 0 to 99. The Nz function will return the value listed if the field is Null. So the first time you execute that code, the DMax should return a Null since no numbers have been generated for the PONum field. The Nz will then substitute 99 and then increment that by 1. You can accomplish something similar by just entering 100 as the PONum for one record. .

@Andy: I’m sorry that I sounded dismissive. That wasn’t my intent. Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing.


Hello, I'm looking for a way to quickly find what numbers are missing in column B. I can sort them ascending, but how do I find if there are missing numbers? 1 2 3 5 6 7 9 I need to know 4 and 8 are missing. Thank you. One way: select B2:Bx. Choose Format/Conditional Formatting... CF1: Formula is =(B2-B1)>1 Format1: / or, without sorting, select column B (with B1 active): CF1: Formula is =AND(B1>MIN(B:B),COUNTIF(B:B,B1-1)=0) Both CF's will activate if there are missing numbers before them. In article <28706E9E-2624...
Version numbers allow people providing support to ascertain exactly which code a user is running, so that they can rule out bugs that have already been fixed as a cause of an issue, and the like. This is especially important when a program has a substantial user community, especially when that community is large enough that the people providing technical support are not the people who wrote the code. The semantic meaning[1] of version.revision.change style numbering is also important to information technology staff, who often use it to determine how much attention and research they need to pay to a new release before deploying it in their facility. As a rule of thumb, the bigger the changes, the larger the chances that something might break (although examining the Changelog, if any, may reveal only superficial or irrelevant changes). This is one reason for some of the distaste expressed in the “drop the major release” approach taken by Asterisk et alia: now, staff must (or at least should) do a full regression test for every update.

Infinite sequences of digits (or characters) drawn from a finite alphabet are of particular interest in theoretical computer science. They are often referred to simply as sequences or streams, as opposed to finite strings. Infinite binary sequences, for instance, are infinite sequences of bits (characters drawn from the alphabet {0, 1}). The set C = {0, 1}∞ of all infinite binary sequences is sometimes called the Cantor space.


I tossed back a rather glib answer about using the AutoNumLgl field code to number the discovery requests, and she threw in this little wrinkle: her attorneys like to play mix-and-match with their discovery. In other words, they may put in a couple of interrogatories, then throw in a related request for production, then another interrogatory, then a request for admission that’s related to that interrogatory.
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.
Works great with desktop printers or high speed digital printers. Merges numbering with .pdf .tif and .bmp graphic files allowing the user to print and number a job in one pass. A real money maker for jobs that just aren’t cost effective to print on press! Try it before you buy. We have provided fully functional demos for you to download. You can make sure that our software will be right for you. Once you’re satisfied, place your order on our secure server.
So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.
OK I found the ControlSource property but it is on the Job No text box, do I enter the code there or am I entering my code on the button I created to save and get new number? If I put it behind the button, when I open the form it goes to the first record so I go to the last record and hit save get new number button and it gives me the number 1……Is it because when I open the form it goes to the first record and not a new record????
Warning  Making even minor changes to an outline numbering scheme won't necessarily change the initial position you've selected in the gallery, but rather may create a new gallery position, overwriting an existing one. Because of this problem, attaching numbering to styles is strongly recommended. This is covered in greater detail later in this chapter and in the chapter on Styles.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)

Footnotes, after all, are always numbered sequentially and update when you add or remove one. The problem is that each time you add a footnote you get an extra space down at the bottom of the column. The solution? Make a paragraph style for your footnotes that specifies a .1 pt tall size with a 0 (zero) leading, then choose that paragraph style in the Document Footnote Options dialog box.
Hello! I would like to chart varying salaries against specific Low, middle and high numbers. Any suggestions on how to show this? Example: Salary 1 10000 Salary 2 12000 Salary 3 16000 Low 9000 Mid 15000 High 19000 THANK YOU! Do you want the Low-Mid-High values to be like a benchmark to measure salaries against? You could put horizontal lines across your chart, and use markers for the salary data. Here' a few ways to get your lines: http://peltiertech.com/Excel/Charts/AddLine.html - Jon ------- Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP Peltier Technical Services Tutorials... sequential numbering
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