Is there a way to auto number files with the file number (less .jpeg) and save without having to let my computer grind to a halt, as it does using Automate, contact sheet. The objective is to create a preview set for distribution to clients with the file number annotated at bottom centre. Also, is there any way of creating the text/font/colour/stroke of my choice?
Hi Jason! Hard to say when I’m not sure which part isn’t working for you. If the numbering isn’t continuing across separate frames, you need to make sure you’re using a list. If they are in the wrong order, remember it uses the paste/creation order to number them. If neither of those fix it, let me know what specific issue you’re having. Good luck!
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
You can define a section prefix to label section pages automatically. For example, if you specify A– for Section Prefix on page 16 of a document and include the section prefix, the page will appear in the table of contents or index as A–16. Text you type for a section marker appears when you choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Section Marker.
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
I like where your idea is going, but I cannot figure out how to consecutively number across text frames on one document. So far I have created a csv document in Excel, drew a textbox, imported the csv file into the Data Merge window and dragged it into the text frame. Now, I've got "<<00001>>" in the text frame. When I click "Create Merged Document" I get an error message: "Cannot creat merged document because no placeholders are present..." Now what?

Hi Jason! Hard to say when I’m not sure which part isn’t working for you. If the numbering isn’t continuing across separate frames, you need to make sure you’re using a list. If they are in the wrong order, remember it uses the paste/creation order to number them. If neither of those fix it, let me know what specific issue you’re having. Good luck!
An alternative to writing the domain of a sequence in the subscript is to indicate the range of values that the index can take by listing its highest and lowest legal values. For example, the notation {\displaystyle (k^{2})_{k=1}^{10}} denotes the ten-term sequence of squares {\displaystyle (1,4,9,...,100)} . The limits {\displaystyle \infty } and {\displaystyle -\infty } are allowed, but they do not represent valid values for the index, only the supremum or infimum of such values, respectively. For example, the sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n=1}^{\infty }} is the same as the sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} , and does not contain an additional term "at infinity". The sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n=-\infty }^{\infty }} is a bi-infinite sequence, and can also be written as {\displaystyle (...,a_{-1},a_{0},a_{1},a_{2},...)} .
All I want to know is, how do you link fields, like {SEQ}, to a style – so that if I select/apply style “Figure Caption” (my style, I also have “Table Caption”), I get not just the attributes of the style (what it looks like, where it is on the page etc.) but I get a chapter (or section) number + a sequence number added, (e.g. “2-3”). I know about STYLEREF and SEQ Figure # and/or calling a section number (if required) – but I can’t find out how to take the simple and to me obvious step to have sequential numbering (prefixed with either “Figure” or “Table”) attached to my Figure Caption style. It all seems to be a two-step process: (i) select the style, (ii) select the numbering. I want to do both at style level. I want to see/get (e.g.) “Figure 2-3: Linking figure numbering to styles” just by applying my “Figure Caption” style to my figure caption text “Linking figure numbering to styles”. Please, only tell me how to do that, how to link chapter/sequence numbering via a style – i.e. in just one step – applying the style.
This difference is not simply a case of syntax. In order to provide a large workspace, conventional spreadsheets extend a table in X and Y to form a very large grid – ideally infinite, but normally limited to some smaller dimension.[N 2] Some of these cells, selected by the user, hold data. Data is manipulated using formulas, which are placed in other cells in the same sheet and output their results back into the formula cell’s display. The rest of the sheet is “sparse”, currently unused.[5] Sheets often grow very complex with input data, intermediate values from formulas and output areas, separated by blank areas. In order to manage this complexity, Excel allows one to hide data that is not of interest,[6] often intermediate values. Quattro Pro commonly introduced the idea of multiple sheets in a single book, allowing further subdivision of the data.
Sequential exit numbering usually begins with exit 1 at the beginning of the road; each subsequent exit is given the next number. Letter suffixes are commonly used when new exits are added. For example, on the New York State Thruway, an exit was added between 21 and 22, and was given the number 21A. Subsequently, a new exit was added between 21 and 21A, leading to the sequence 21 - 21B - 21A - 22. In Florida, some new exits got the suffix C, so that if it had or acquired separate exits for the two directions, they would be 15CA and 15CB rather than 15AB. There are also occurrences of this happening on the New Jersey Turnpike; the original interchanges opened in 1951, with newer exits as recently as 1982. On the Baltimore Beltway, there is an exit 12B-C (MD 372), as well as 12A (US 1). There is also an exit 8A (I-895) and an exit 8 (MD 168).
You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.
And of course, it’s not only when you add or delete counters that the numbering auto-updates, but also when you copy or move the text, as when you’re rearranging your listed points. This InDesign inline counter now works exactly like the counters in my old, beloved XyWrite word processors — except I cannot have several counters with separate numbering in the same text story. In XyWrite I could have nine, using only the codes c1, c2,…c9. But for 95% of one’s counter needs, one counter per story is quite ample — as compared to none.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
×