NCR booklets for receipt forms and invoice forms are very handy as a copy of the form can be easily torn from the booklet and given to the customer, while leaving a copy in the booklet for the business. Pages are perforated for easy removal. A sturdy cover wrap maintains the booklet’s integrity and can be inserted between forms to prevent transfer when completing the form.
For controlname you need to use the name of the control bound to your Project ID# field. However, the # may be complicating things. Type the Me. and Intellisense should give you a list of controls and methods. Press the P key to go to Ps and scroll until you find the controlname. Selecting the name from the Intellisense list will make sure you are using the correct control. That control needs to have a ControlSource of the Project ID# field. If you do this correctly, then pressing the button should populate the control with the next number. It will also save the record.
Set up a matrix in Excel, one column for each ticket position (stack) and one row for each sheet, plus one for field names. Fill the first column down in consecutive order, then the second, starting where the first column leaves off, and so on. Afet a couple of columns are filled, you can auto fill across the rows, too, so the whole thing takes only a couple of minutes. Name the stacks and use a different field for each position on the page when you do the merge. The trick is to set up using a custom file for the total number of tickets or whatever, divided into the correct number of stacks and sheets.
In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
Scott, trying my best to have sequential numbering almost identical to your scenario 1 (bound control on input form which increments last number by 1). Where do I enter this code? I have a form which opens and is ready for entry of new Project Designs. I want to show in the control box the next Project ID (a number) so do I place the code, Me.txtProject ID = Nz(DMax(“[Project ID]”,”DESIGN PROJECTS”),0)+1, under On Load, After Update, or where? And also, the Me.Dirty = False or DoCmd.RunCommand
Numbers has been well received in the press, notably for its text-based formulas, clean looks and ease-of-use.[17][18][19] Macworld has given it high marks, especially newer versions, awarding Numbers ’09 four mice out of five. They did point out a number of common issues, especially problems exporting to Excel and the inability to “lock” cells to prevent them moving when the table is scrolled.[14] Numbers for the iPhone and iPad have received similar favorable reviews.[20]

you'd need to use a before save macro. Something like the macro at the end - but it would run on every save, which may not be what you want. I use a macro that gets the invoice # and saves (it does several things). I added a button to the ribbon that calls a macro that runs several macros: Sub FinalizeInvoice() CreateInvoiceNumber CopyToExcel FinalCleanup ' this does the save End Sub This is an automated macro - but it will run every time the file is saved. Private WithEvents App As Word.Application Private Sub Document_Open() Set App = Word.Application… Read more »
Hi Scott, I had a question regarding the sequential numbering Apex example…I am looking to automatically restart the sequence every month, which is not a problem using your example (i.e. changing the year to month in the expression). However, I would also like to add in a condition for year, so that the sequence restarts for each month of each year (i.e. my problem is for example that Feb 2011 last sequence number is 5, and then in Feb 2012 this becomes 6, where I would like it to be 1). I am wondering what the syntax would be. Thanks in advance, Lawn.
Normally, the term infinite sequence refers to a sequence that is infinite in one direction, and finite in the other—the sequence has a first element, but no final element. Such a sequence is called a singly infinite sequence or a one-sided infinite sequence when disambiguation is necessary. In contrast, a sequence that is infinite in both directions—i.e. that has neither a first nor a final element—is called a bi-infinite sequence, two-way infinite sequence, or doubly infinite sequence. A function from the set Z of all integers into a set, such as for instance the sequence of all even integers ( …, −4, −2, 0, 2, 4, 6, 8… ), is bi-infinite. This sequence could be denoted {\displaystyle (2n)_{n=-\infty }^{\infty }} .
Using this script… no. While I use the data merge feature of InDesign often, I avoid the “multiple records” feature, but I typically prepare one record on one page, output the resulting file to PDF and then let the imposing software take care of the page imposition. If page imposition software is something that you don’t have, there is an alternate technique that requires preparing one record on a page, and then using the multipageimporter2.5 script to import them onto a larger sheet. Here is the link to that article: http://colecandoo.com/2011/10/28/theres-more-than-one-way-to-cut-and-stack/

Other examples of sequences include ones made up of rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers. The sequence (.9, .99, .999, .9999, ...) approaches the number 1. In fact, every real number can be written as the limit of a sequence of rational numbers, e.g. via its decimal expansion. For instance, π is the limit of the sequence (3, 3.1, 3.14, 3.141, 3.1415, ...). A related sequence is the sequence of decimal digits of π, i.e. (3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, ...). This sequence does not have any pattern that is easily discernible by eye, unlike the preceding sequence, which is increasing.
If the sequence of real numbers (an) is such that all the terms are less than some real number M, then the sequence is said to be bounded from above. In other words, this means that there exists M such that for all n, an ≤ M. Any such M is called an upper bound. Likewise, if, for some real m, an ≥ m for all n greater than some N, then the sequence is bounded from below and any such m is called a lower bound. If a sequence is both bounded from above and bounded from below, then the sequence is said to be bounded.

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Thank you very much for this very useful information. May I ask how I can stop the whole document captions from being updated to the same numbering style? The problem is some of my figures are under a level 2 heading and some under a level 4 heading etc. I want to be able to have for example figure 1.1-1 as well as figure 2.3.1-1. Thank you very much.

There are a number of ways to denote a sequence, some of which are more useful for specific types of sequences. One way to specify a sequence is to list the elements. For example, the first four odd numbers form the sequence (1, 3, 5, 7). This notation can be used for infinite sequences as well. For instance, the infinite sequence of positive odd integers can be written (1, 3, 5, 7, ...). Listing is most useful for infinite sequences with a pattern that can be easily discerned from the first few elements. Other ways to denote a sequence are discussed after the examples.


Although sequences are a type of function, they are usually distinguished notationally from functions in that the input is written as a subscript rather than in parentheses, i.e. an rather than f(n). There are terminological differences as well: the value of a sequence at the input 1 is called the "first element" of the sequence, the value at 2 is called the "second element", etc. Also, while a function abstracted from its input is usually denoted by a single letter, e.g. f, a sequence abstracted from its input is usually written by a notation such as {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n\in A}} , or just as {\displaystyle (a_{n})} . Here A is the domain, or index set, of the sequence.


Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.

Hello, I'm looking for a way to quickly find what numbers are missing in column B. I can sort them ascending, but how do I find if there are missing numbers? 1 2 3 5 6 7 9 I need to know 4 and 8 are missing. Thank you. One way: select B2:Bx. Choose Format/Conditional Formatting... CF1: Formula is =(B2-B1)>1 Format1: / or, without sorting, select column B (with B1 active): CF1: Formula is =AND(B1>MIN(B:B),COUNTIF(B:B,B1-1)=0) Both CF's will activate if there are missing numbers before them. In article <28706E9E-2624...

How do I set up the basic template for text numbering in Word 2008 for the Mac? Here is what is driving me nuts: I want to generate numbered lists - lots and lots of them. The first level numbered lines will have second level under them in many cases, also numbered and indented below the first level. The second level will also have third level under them, intended some more and also numbered. This "sort-of" works fine. It USED to work excellently. Here is what I do. I click the Numbering button in the Bullets and Numbering palette. The line indents and a 1) is aut...


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