Informally, a sequence has a limit if the elements of the sequence become closer and closer to some value {\displaystyle L} (called the limit of the sequence), and they become and remain arbitrarily close to {\displaystyle L} , meaning that given a real number {\displaystyle d} greater than zero, all but a finite number of the elements of the sequence have a distance from {\displaystyle L} less than {\displaystyle d} .
Hi, As a new user to excel I am thinking of setting up a data base of my music. The total number of tracks is in excess of 70,000. I have seen a simple solution using excel which would be ok but I'm not sure if I can have 70,000 rows in one work sheet. A friend has suggested access which I am not familiar with and don't know if this will allow 70,000 entries. Can anyone please tell me what the maximum numbers are in both access and excel 2003. Cheers Glinty Max in Excel 2003 is 65536 (in one sheet) whereas Access only limit is your memory -- Regards, Peo Sjoblom ...
Ok, generating a random 3 digit number is a whole different thing, so I’m not going to go into that. If you want your numbers to start at 100 (to insure three digits) then change the 0 to 99. The Nz function will return the value listed if the field is Null. So the first time you execute that code, the DMax should return a Null since no numbers have been generated for the PONum field. The Nz will then substitute 99 and then increment that by 1. You can accomplish something similar by just entering 100 as the PONum for one record. .
Hi All, I am working on a YTD Sales report. I would like to know if I can create a cell in a query that will be a squential number. Starting with 1 on up. If so how would I do this? Report would look something like: Num Customer YTD Sales 1 Bobs Sales 495,000 2 Denny's 395,000 3 Biffs Supply 390,000 4.... -- Matt Campbell mattc (at) saunatec [dot] com Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com You can use a text box in the report: Control Source: =1 Running Sum: Over All -- Duane Hookom Microsoft Access MVP "mattc66 via AccessMo...
* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.
Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.

I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.


 I'm looking for a script for Laserfiche Forms that will query a database and pull the next number in sequence and display it as the unique identifier for this document.  Once this number has been used, the number should not be used again.  This is similar to what the Submission ID is, but from what I can gather, this number is assigned after the submission takes place.  
Hello, I'm looking for a way to quickly find what numbers are missing in column B. I can sort them ascending, but how do I find if there are missing numbers? 1 2 3 5 6 7 9 I need to know 4 and 8 are missing. Thank you. One way: select B2:Bx. Choose Format/Conditional Formatting... CF1: Formula is =(B2-B1)>1 Format1: / or, without sorting, select column B (with B1 active): CF1: Formula is =AND(B1>MIN(B:B),COUNTIF(B:B,B1-1)=0) Both CF's will activate if there are missing numbers before them. In article <28706E9E-2624... sequential numbering in coreldraw
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