The ticket numbering problem seems solved, if awkwardly. But what about linking automatic numbering of text references to a figure (e.g. “see fig.101″) to a legend of that figure (e.g. Fig. 101 shows….”)? Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author!
is defined as the set of all sequences {\displaystyle (x_{i})_{i\in \mathbb {N} }} such that for each i, {\displaystyle x_{i}} is an element of {\displaystyle X_{i}} . The canonical projections are the maps pi : X → Xi defined by the equation {\displaystyle p_{i}((x_{j})_{j\in \mathbb {N} })=x_{i}} . Then the product topology on X is defined to be the coarsest topology (i.e. the topology with the fewest open sets) for which all the projections pi are continuous. The product topology is sometimes called the Tychonoff topology.
I have a large job for a client who uses antique computers. They are so old that he can't run Lightroom. As a workaround, I posted the images I wanted him to look at on SmugMug and we had a disaster. Their sequencing on screen does not match my "as shot" sorting on my Lightroom (4). Is there a way I can print sequential serial numbers/ids on my images before I upload them to SmugMug so we are always talking about the same image?

I have a large job for a client who uses antique computers. They are so old that he can't run Lightroom. As a workaround, I posted the images I wanted him to look at on SmugMug and we had a disaster. Their sequencing on screen does not match my "as shot" sorting on my Lightroom (4). Is there a way I can print sequential serial numbers/ids on my images before I upload them to SmugMug so we are always talking about the same image?
Version numbers allow people providing support to ascertain exactly which code a user is running, so that they can rule out bugs that have already been fixed as a cause of an issue, and the like. This is especially important when a program has a substantial user community, especially when that community is large enough that the people providing technical support are not the people who wrote the code. The semantic meaning[1] of version.revision.change style numbering is also important to information technology staff, who often use it to determine how much attention and research they need to pay to a new release before deploying it in their facility. As a rule of thumb, the bigger the changes, the larger the chances that something might break (although examining the Changelog, if any, may reveal only superficial or irrelevant changes). This is one reason for some of the distaste expressed in the “drop the major release” approach taken by Asterisk et alia: now, staff must (or at least should) do a full regression test for every update.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don’t need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher. sequential numbering in word
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