You could set up a new label (‘ES’) on the Caption dialog box and use that for your ES tables. You’d also have to add a new List of Tables to your document, selecting ‘ES’ from the ‘Caption Label’ list. However, if you just use ‘ES’, then you would only have one sequence for both figs and tables in the Exec Summary. If you needed two separate sequences, then I suggest you create two labels — ‘ES Table’ and ‘ES Figure’.
For the purposes of this article, we define a sequence to be a function whose domain is an interval of integers. This definition covers several different uses of the word "sequence", including one-sided infinite sequences, bi-infinite sequences, and finite sequences (see below for definitions). However, many authors use a narrower definition by requiring the domain of a sequence to be the set of natural numbers. The narrower definition has the disadvantage that it rules out finite sequences and bi-infinite sequences, both of which are usually called sequences in standard mathematical practice. In some contexts, to shorten exposition, the codomain of the sequence is fixed by context, for example by requiring it to be the set R of real numbers,[2] the set C of complex numbers,[3] or a topological space.[4]
What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in Microsoft Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. "Mike C" wrote in message news:BC4F1F10-A96C-4EC7-9E33-670828E53A0A@microsoft.com... > What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in > Microsoft > Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. Google or the online help would be your friend on this one. There's no fixed limit, there's only the limit on the overall size of the database file...
Word's numbering feature is easy to use, but it doesn't work in all situations. For instance, it can't handle an inline number sequence. By inline, I mean a sequence of numbers positioned within regular text. Fortunately, the SEQ field code handles these situations. I'll start by showing you how to insert the SEQ field code manually, for those one-time occurrences. If you use this feature often, you'll want to add AutoCorrect items for quick insertion into your text. So we'll look at that, too.

Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.

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