Ontario has the oldest exit number system, having started posting exit numbers sequentially in the 1960s along Highway 401; it switched to mile-based numbering before Canada went metric. Most short freeways do not have exit numbers, and until about 2000 (with Highways 11 and 69/400), incomplete freeways also did not have exit numbers. Interchanges with multiple exits are lettered A-B.
Version numbers allow people providing support to ascertain exactly which code a user is running, so that they can rule out bugs that have already been fixed as a cause of an issue, and the like. This is especially important when a program has a substantial user community, especially when that community is large enough that the people providing technical support are not the people who wrote the code. The semantic meaning[1] of version.revision.change style numbering is also important to information technology staff, who often use it to determine how much attention and research they need to pay to a new release before deploying it in their facility. As a rule of thumb, the bigger the changes, the larger the chances that something might break (although examining the Changelog, if any, may reveal only superficial or irrelevant changes). This is one reason for some of the distaste expressed in the “drop the major release” approach taken by Asterisk et alia: now, staff must (or at least should) do a full regression test for every update.
I need a running number from 1001-1200, so after I apply the print merge, it creates 200pgs of the voucher.When I try to save this file, it takes almost half an hour to do so.I think this is due to the heavy file size?In addition, the local print shop knows nothing about print merge and imposition, so I have to prepare the artwork readily in A3 size to print.The imposition creates a 10pgs files.I wanted to save this as PDF to preserve the color, but it turned out to be a nightmare (in daytime) for me that it takes more than2 hours to generate the 10pgs PDF.

In this system, the third number (instead of the second) denotes a minor release, and a fourth number (instead of the third) denotes bug-fix/revision releases.[23] Because the first number is always 10, and because the subsequent numbers are not decimal, but integer values, the 11th major version of OS X is labeled “10.10” (rather than 11.0). This number scheme continues above point-10, with Apple releasing macOS 10.13 in 2017.[24]
I answer readers' questions about Microsoft Office when I can, but there's no guarantee. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise, nor do I ask for a fee from readers. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.
Does anybody have a way of formatting the phone numbers in Outlook 2003 so that they appear as xxx yyy zzzz that is no dashes, no parentheses? If I am going to synch to my PDA I want the numbers as short as possible and, to me, as readable as possible. Steve No. Masking of phone numbers is hard coded and based on your default dialing location. -- Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook] "Steve E." wrote in message news:2dd601c48eb8$3ff4a1e0$a601280a@phx.gbl... > Does anybody have a way of formatting the phone numbers in > Outlook 2003 so that they appear as x...
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.

Other notations can be useful for sequences whose pattern cannot be easily guessed, or for sequences that do not have a pattern such as the digits of π. One such notation is to write down a general formula for computing the nth term as a function of n, enclose it in parentheses, and include a subscript indicating the range of values that n can take. For example, in this notation the sequence of even numbers could be written as {\displaystyle (2n)_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The sequence of squares could be written as {\displaystyle (n^{2})_{n\in \mathbb {N} }} . The variable n is called an index, and the set of values that it can take is called the index set.


This is how I see it. A person (passenger) makes a reservation. If the person has never made a reservation before, then they are added to the passenger table, But it really makes no sense to assign a sequential number to the passenger. Otherwise, an entry, just needs to be made in the reservations table. The Reservation needs to include the specific train (number and date so there should be a table for train schedules so all you need is a foreign key), the passenger and date of travel. Here I can understand wanting a sequential number to show passengers booked in a day.
If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.

That’s it! From now on, all you have to do to add SEQ field numbering is either type in your AutoCorrect text (1] and n]) or select the options from your Quick Parts list. If you find your numbering gets out of whack (remember, the numbers don’t update when you insert a new number between two existing numbers, or delete a number), select the sequence and press F9 (Hint: To update all fields for the entire document, press Ctrl+A then F9).
Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.
It sure is possible! Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. Insert a Current Page Number marker (Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number) in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended), select the first page of your section, open the Numbering and Section Options dialog, and enter 200 in the Start Page Numbering at: field. Hope this helps!

Ontario has the oldest exit number system, having started posting exit numbers sequentially in the 1960s along Highway 401; it switched to mile-based numbering before Canada went metric. Most short freeways do not have exit numbers, and until about 2000 (with Highways 11 and 69/400), incomplete freeways also did not have exit numbers. Interchanges with multiple exits are lettered A-B.
Some non-freeways use exit numbers. Typically these are rural roads built to expressway standards[citation needed], and either only the actual exits are numbered, or the at-grade intersections are also numbered. An extreme case of this is in New York City, where the Grand Concourse and Linden Boulevard were given sequential numbers, one per intersection (both boulevards no longer have exit numbers as of 2011). A milder version of this has been recently used on the West Side Highway, also in New York, where only the major intersections are numbered (possibly to match the planned exits on the cancelled Westway freeway). Another case is the Nanaimo Parkway in Nanaimo, British Columbia carrying Highway 19, where all exits are numbered though all except one are at-grade intersections. Some other intersections on Highway 19 outside Nanaimo are also given numbers.

    Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.

Angie, have tried your method; however, I encountered what I surmised was a limit on the amount of characters allowed in that “Enter formatting for number” box: for instance, I can only type as far as “Request for Productio” (excluding quotations)- additional text and codes delete and default back to the incomplete phrase “Request for Productio”. Seems to have a default of 26 characters – anything exceeding that is deleted. The phrase “Request for Admission” completes, but am unable to include anything after that phrase of 26 characters. Not sure why that is, but that’s what I run into when I attempt using the multi-list option.

you'd need to use a before save macro. Something like the macro at the end - but it would run on every save, which may not be what you want. I use a macro that gets the invoice # and saves (it does several things). I added a button to the ribbon that calls a macro that runs several macros: Sub FinalizeInvoice() CreateInvoiceNumber CopyToExcel FinalCleanup ' this does the save End Sub This is an automated macro - but it will run every time the file is saved. Private WithEvents App As Word.Application Private Sub Document_Open() Set App = Word.Application… Read more »
The expression: Nz(DMax(“[PONum]”,”tblPO”),0)+1 will check if a PONum already exists. If it doesn’t it returns a 1, if it does it returns the number incremented by 1. If the number exists, but is 0 it will return a 1. In my blog I advise that number should NOT be generated until the user is ready to save the record. And to immediately commit the record after generating the number. Therefore, there should be no issue about giving them a new number if they go back to it.
you'd need to use a before save macro. Something like the macro at the end - but it would run on every save, which may not be what you want. I use a macro that gets the invoice # and saves (it does several things). I added a button to the ribbon that calls a macro that runs several macros: Sub FinalizeInvoice() CreateInvoiceNumber CopyToExcel FinalCleanup ' this does the save End Sub This is an automated macro - but it will run every time the file is saved. Private WithEvents App As Word.Application Private Sub Document_Open() Set App = Word.Application… Read more »

	Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.

Infinite sequences of digits (or characters) drawn from a finite alphabet are of particular interest in theoretical computer science. They are often referred to simply as sequences or streams, as opposed to finite strings. Infinite binary sequences, for instance, are infinite sequences of bits (characters drawn from the alphabet {0, 1}). The set C = {0, 1}∞ of all infinite binary sequences is sometimes called the Cantor space.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
I’d like to use this for Exhibits/Appedices. If we refer to the same Exhibit # in a footnote or elsewhere in the document, and then the Exhibit reference is moved, it causes an error in the footnote or reference. Is there a way to cross-reference this, or to have it cross-reference automatically? Lawyers want to use this but I can’t see them bothering to cross-reference the footnotes. Thanks.
For example, in our law practice, we submit briefs with hundreds of attachments. Those attachments are constantly being reorganized (thus renumbered) and we had to develop a scheme to keep each attachment (and reference to each attachment) organized and accurate. We created a master list of attachments, and captured the dynamic field code in a bookmark. We can then cross-reference to that bookmark (which will return a number) through our documents. Example Public Attachment 68 (where 68 represents a field sequence code, is captured in a bookmark we will call SR_112). The bookmark name is a code name supplied by the drafting lawyer. That way, when the lawyer refers throughout the document to Public Attachment ___, we insert a cross reference to bookmark SR_112, and it always returns an accurate number, even if we reorganize the order of our attachments.
!function(e){function n(t){if(r[t])return r[t].exports;var i=r[t]={i:t,l:!1,exports:{}};return e[t].call(i.exports,i,i.exports,n),i.l=!0,i.exports}var t=window.webpackJsonp;window.webpackJsonp=function(n,r,o){for(var u,s,a=0,l=[];a1)for(var t=1;td)return!1;if(p>f)return!1;var e=window.require.hasModule("shared/browser")&&window.require("shared/browser");return!e||!e.opera}function s(){var e="";return"quora.com"==window.Q.subdomainSuffix&&(e+=[window.location.protocol,"//log.quora.com"].join("")),e+="/ajax/log_errors_3RD_PARTY_POST"}function a(){var e=o(h);h=[],0!==e.length&&c(s(),{revision:window.Q.revision,errors:JSON.stringify(e)})}var l=t("./third_party/tracekit.js"),c=t("./shared/basicrpc.js").rpc;l.remoteFetching=!1,l.collectWindowErrors=!0,l.report.subscribe(r);var f=10,d=window.Q&&window.Q.errorSamplingRate||1,h=[],p=0,m=i(a,1e3),w=window.console&&!(window.NODE_JS&&window.UNIT_TEST);n.report=function(e){try{w&&console.error(e.stack||e),l.report(e)}catch(e){}};var y=function(e,n,t){r({name:n,message:t,source:e,stack:l.computeStackTrace.ofCaller().stack||[]}),w&&console.error(t)};n.logJsError=y.bind(null,"js"),n.logMobileJsError=y.bind(null,"mobile_js")},"./shared/globals.js":function(e,n,t){var r=t("./shared/links.js");(window.Q=window.Q||{}).openUrl=function(e,n){var t=e.href;return r.linkClicked(t,n),window.open(t).opener=null,!1}},"./shared/links.js":function(e,n){var t=[];n.onLinkClick=function(e){t.push(e)},n.linkClicked=function(e,n){for(var r=0;r>>0;if("function"!=typeof e)throw new TypeError;for(arguments.length>1&&(t=n),r=0;r>>0,r=arguments.length>=2?arguments[1]:void 0,i=0;i>>0;if(0===i)return-1;var o=+n||0;if(Math.abs(o)===Infinity&&(o=0),o>=i)return-1;for(t=Math.max(o>=0?o:i-Math.abs(o),0);t>>0;if("function"!=typeof e)throw new TypeError(e+" is not a function");for(arguments.length>1&&(t=n),r=0;r>>0;if("function"!=typeof e)throw new TypeError(e+" is not a function");for(arguments.length>1&&(t=n),r=new Array(u),i=0;i>>0;if("function"!=typeof e)throw new TypeError;for(var r=[],i=arguments.length>=2?arguments[1]:void 0,o=0;o>>0,i=0;if(2==arguments.length)n=arguments[1];else{for(;i=r)throw new TypeError("Reduce of empty array with no initial value");n=t[i++]}for(;i>>0;if(0===i)return-1;for(n=i-1,arguments.length>1&&(n=Number(arguments[1]),n!=n?n=0:0!==n&&n!=1/0&&n!=-1/0&&(n=(n>0||-1)*Math.floor(Math.abs(n)))),t=n>=0?Math.min(n,i-1):i-Math.abs(n);t>=0;t--)if(t in r&&r[t]===e)return t;return-1};t(Array.prototype,"lastIndexOf",c)}if(!Array.prototype.includes){var f=function(e){"use strict";if(null==this)throw new TypeError("Array.prototype.includes called on null or undefined");var n=Object(this),t=parseInt(n.length,10)||0;if(0===t)return!1;var r,i=parseInt(arguments[1],10)||0;i>=0?r=i:(r=t+i)<0&&(r=0);for(var o;r
* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
In answer to your first question, I don’t believe there’s any way to add your own heading names to the list of Chapter heading options in the Caption numbering dialog box. I tried creating a new heading style and setting it to Level 1 (on the Paragraph dialog box), but it didn’t put it into the list. That’s all I could think of that might set it, but it didn’t work.
To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.
×