Each section within an InDesign document can be numbered differently. This allows you to use one type of numerals to consecutively number a document's preface or other introductory materials and another numeral system for the remainder of the document. You must first define your document's sections, and then you can add section markers or page markers to your master pages. Apply the master page to document pages to include the section and page numbers on the document pages.
To define a sequence by recursion, one needs a rule to construct each element in terms of the ones before it. In addition, enough initial elements must be provided so that all subsequent elements of the sequence can be computed by the rule. The principle of mathematical induction can be used to prove that in this case, there is exactly one sequence that satisfies both the recursion rule and the initial conditions. Induction can also be used to prove properties about a sequence, especially for sequences whose most natural description is recursive.
You want to do this because your document is long and readers can’t easily find the tables/figures they want as numbers like Table 34 are meaningless unless you find the table captions before/after ‘Table 34’. By changing the numbering sequence to include the chapter numbers, your readers will have guideposts to aid their search — if they are in Section 5, they will know that Table 3.2 is back in Section 3 and is the second table in that section.
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.
If you want to save all that work you just did, click the Save button. As you exit Word, the Building Blocks (the feature Quick Parts and AutoText are grouped under) are being saved in your Normal template. If you’re really up for a challenge, you could start a whole new discovery template with its own set of Building Blocks like the ones above, then distribute it to your work group so they can get the benefit of your new-found expertise.

Both the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland use sequential numbering systems, with the junction number indicated by a white number in a black square in the corner of signs. In the United Kingdom they are frequently referenced in the media as the number with "J" on front of it, with for example Junction 1 being referred to as "J1". If a junction is newly constructed to between two existing junctions, it is normally allocated the number of the lower of the two junctions, with the letter "A" attached (and so on). For example, a new junction opened between junctions 3 and 4 would become Junction 3A.

I removed the required setting on the table level. The form does not give me an error message now, but does not close on its on. I closed it via a command then looked at the Design Projects table to see if the new record, #896, shows up. A new record is there, with all the entered data EXCEPT the very important field of the Project ID. That field is blank.
OK I found the ControlSource property but it is on the Job No text box, do I enter the code there or am I entering my code on the button I created to save and get new number? If I put it behind the button, when I open the form it goes to the first record so I go to the last record and hit save get new number button and it gives me the number 1……Is it because when I open the form it goes to the first record and not a new record????
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).
Creating a sequential list of numbers, in Word, sounds like an intimidating task. Sure, you can create a numbered list quickly enough, but that feature works with additional text - you're numbering something. If you want a list of just numbers, you have to work a bit harder. Word's SEQ field might come to mind, but that solution is better suited to template-type numbering. In order words, this field works great if you're numbering documents, labels, and so on. It doesn't work so well if you just want to create a list of sequential numbers. You can use it that way, but it'll be more work than it's worth.
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