An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
There is no exit zero. If there is an exit within 1.499 km of the origin, Exit 1 is used. Exit 2 would be between 1.500 and 2.499 km of the origin. Subsequent 'exit zones' are at 1 km intervals. Letter suffixes are added at multi-exit interchanges, or where two or more exits exist within the same exit zone. For example, State Highway 1 (Southern Motorway) has an Exit 429A (Symonds St), Exit 429B (Wellesley St) and Exit 429C (Port). Instead of replacing existing ramp and link signs, the exit numbers were added as supplementary information. Thus drivers can navigate either by exit number or name. Exit numbers are only used for exits that may be used by all vehicle types. Bus- or emergency vehicle-only exits would not be numbered.

In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
NCR booklets for receipt forms and invoice forms are very handy as a copy of the form can be easily torn from the booklet and given to the customer, while leaving a copy in the booklet for the business. Pages are perforated for easy removal. A sturdy cover wrap maintains the booklet’s integrity and can be inserted between forms to prevent transfer when completing the form.
Scott, trying my best to have sequential numbering almost identical to your scenario 1 (bound control on input form which increments last number by 1). Where do I enter this code? I have a form which opens and is ready for entry of new Project Designs. I want to show in the control box the next Project ID (a number) so do I place the code, Me.txtProject ID = Nz(DMax(“[Project ID]”,”DESIGN PROJECTS”),0)+1, under On Load, After Update, or where? And also, the Me.Dirty = False or DoCmd.RunCommand

In this system, the third number (instead of the second) denotes a minor release, and a fourth number (instead of the third) denotes bug-fix/revision releases.[23] Because the first number is always 10, and because the subsequent numbers are not decimal, but integer values, the 11th major version of OS X is labeled “10.10” (rather than 11.0). This number scheme continues above point-10, with Apple releasing macOS 10.13 in 2017.[24]
I have a similar question about numbering – but a bit more complicated. U want to convert the caption number sequences from a single number sequence to reflect the heading that the table/figure is sitting under. For example, if it’s sitting under heading 6.2, the first table or figure would be Table/Figure 6.2 a, then 6.2 b and so on, until after the next heading, where they would start again – 6.3 a and so on. How do I do that?!!

Despite its difficulties and drawbacks Word's automatic numbering can be harnessed. The best method I have seen for doing that is with outline numbering as explained by MVP Shauna Kelly in: Outline numbering in Microsoft Word. This takes a good bit of work to get it set-up, but if you get it set up in a template it is well worth the effort and most of your automatic paragraph numbering issues will be resolved.
Some sequential exits are renumbered (remaining sequential) due to added exits. For instance, the Hutchinson River Parkway in New York was renumbered so that its northernmost exit, 27, became 30. However, the Merritt Parkway, which continued the Hutchinson's exit numbers in Connecticut, was not renumbered. This means the Route 120A interchange is numbered 27 in Connecticut and 30 in New York.
A sequence is said to be monotonically increasing, if each term is greater than or equal to the one before it. For example, the sequence {\displaystyle (a_{n})_{n=1}^{\infty }} is monotonically increasing if and only if an+1 {\displaystyle \geq } an for all n ∈ N. If each consecutive term is strictly greater than (>) the previous term then the sequence is called strictly monotonically increasing. A sequence is monotonically decreasing, if each consecutive term is less than or equal to the previous one, and strictly monotonically decreasing, if each is strictly less than the previous. If a sequence is either increasing or decreasing it is called a monotone sequence. This is a special case of the more general notion of a monotonic function.
LION also carries a heavy-duty, 6 wheel automatic numbering machine with rubber faced wheels. The rubber wheels work great for metal marking and plastic marking when used with LION fast dry ink. As with the other LION numbering machines, this machine is made in Japan with precision crafted one-piece hardened steel frame with all metal interior construction. LION machines will provide years of reliable use. Ideal for sequential numbering operations to use as a date and number stamp, serial number stamp, an inspection stamp and etc.
Hi everybody. I am having a problem with a query that I am working on. I have a table containing customer names, trade dates, and dollar amounts. Customers can have multiple trades on the same day, sometimes even the same dollar amount. I want to have the table sorted by name, date, then dollars so the query pulls everything in from lowest/earliest to highest/latest. I was trying to make a query that pulled in the customer name and trade dates, then added a new column called "Row" that had the record number. I want the query to show all names and dates, since there are ...
Simply copy the second page of the template by highlighting that page and pressing CTRL + C. Windows shortcut keys Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Keyboard shortcuts can save you hours of time. Master the universal Windows keyboard shortcuts, keyboard tricks for specific programs, and a few other tips to speed up your work. Read More are wonderful things. Then create a new blank page by pressing CTRL + Enter. Then paste the copied page using CTRL + V. Create a new blank page, and paste again. Keep doing this until you have the desired number of pages that you will need.

Please tell me there is a way to accomplish this.  As stated, if two users launch the initial submission form with the lookup field populated with P1234 for example, the first user to submit get the number, and the second user now has started there purchasing with a duplicated/invalid number.  Can we increment the field on submission load?  Also, the ability to instead show the purchasing number on event completion doesn't work either, too bad.
Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.
This is how I see it. A person (passenger) makes a reservation. If the person has never made a reservation before, then they are added to the passenger table, But it really makes no sense to assign a sequential number to the passenger. Otherwise, an entry, just needs to be made in the reservations table. The Reservation needs to include the specific train (number and date so there should be a table for train schedules so all you need is a foreign key), the passenger and date of travel. Here I can understand wanting a sequential number to show passengers booked in a day.
Thanks for the quick reply, I think I’m a little confused by the Display aspect of this. Artifact ID is a primary key to the table I am working in and I need it to have a unique identifier that other people can search for. The previously adopted naming convention for this ID is that which I mentioned before, Collection Point ID plus a period and then a sequential number restarting at each new Collection Point ID i.e 2-1050.1, 2-1050.2, 2-1060.1 and so on. So I think I actually need to save this in the Artifact ID field. I realize this might be slightly redundant but I’m not sure how the display would work as far as searching for specific Artifact IDs in the future.
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.
Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
Thank you very much for your prompt reply dear Rhonda. I actually managed to do this somehow. I right-clicked on the caption and clicked edit filed and then field codes. In the code I changed the number showing the heading level, e.g. \s 1, \s 2, \s 3. When I changed the caption heading level in this manner, I noticed that the changed was applied to only that caption and not the rest of the document. So now I have different heading levels in my figure captions. It did the trick for me. Thank you so much and Happy New Year :)

Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.

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