Step 2: Create a new doc for your numbers. Using Paragraph/Bullets and Numbering choose Numbering and set the Format to the 4 digits you've indicated in your sample. In the box below Format, remove the ".^t". This will remove the period & tab after the style. With that style set, hit return to create a number. Repeat for as many numbers of coupons you'll have. You can create 10 and copy & paste for however many numbers you need. You could possibly create your numbers in Xcel, but I'm instructing in ID only.
For whatever reason, AllExperts did not let me post a direct reply to your response re: “Ok, what is the ControlSource of the Fixture Number control? It should be: =cboZone & “-” & Format(Me.FNumber,”000″)” and adding “Me.Refresh” to my code (within the last 10 minutes). It just had the “rate this reply”. I added the Me.Refresh and corrected my location of the =cboZone code and it works correctly now.
I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.

OK, so what didn’t you understand in my blog? The blog contains instructions on how to deal with this. It tells you that you do not want an LH Identifier field. It tells you that all you need is to add a Sequence field to store the Sequential number. It tells you how to base that number on the current year so it restarts with the new year, Finally it tells you how to combine the year and the sequence # with whatever else you need to display the LH identifier. These instructions are all detailed in the blog.
Word's numbering feature is easy to use, but it doesn't work in all situations. For instance, it can't handle an inline number sequence. By inline, I mean a sequence of numbers positioned within regular text. Fortunately, the SEQ field code handles these situations. I'll start by showing you how to insert the SEQ field code manually, for those one-time occurrences. If you use this feature often, you'll want to add AutoCorrect items for quick insertion into your text. So we'll look at that, too.
To create a running list—a list that is interrupted by other paragraphs or that spans multiple stories or documents—create a paragraph style and apply the style to paragraphs that you want to be part of the list. For example, to create a running list of the tables in your document, create a paragraph style called Tables, make a defined list part of the style, and then apply the Tables paragraph style to all paragraphs you want in your Table list.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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