Ok I guess it is better for me to explain what I am doing. I am in the process of creating an Access Database that an individual has been using an Excel spreadsheet forever and a day. Well the individual has on occasion doubled up numbers, forgot numbers, etc. So on what I have learned from different Access courses and Google searches I am trying to apply my knowledge.
I want to have textbox with 2 columns with footnotes running across the bottom of those columns in one column. ID CS3 footnotes can’t handle this. So I have added fake footnote refs in the doc. using this idea. Now the footnotes themselves I can create in another text frame and use this idea again to create them and then manually place them at the bottom of the page. The only problem however with this is the FN options carrry across the whole doc. right? So even if I create a second doc for the footnotes themselves with different options and then later paste it into the main doc it’ll get messed up right?
Hi Jason! Hard to say when I’m not sure which part isn’t working for you. If the numbering isn’t continuing across separate frames, you need to make sure you’re using a list. If they are in the wrong order, remember it uses the paste/creation order to number them. If neither of those fix it, let me know what specific issue you’re having. Good luck!

In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.


Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package
Hi! I hope you help me with this. I have the almost same problem as #2. I have PassengerTable as table name, then I have the following fields: sequence (to follow what you have in your post), transaction_date, and transaction_ID. Basically I want the to have sequential numbering in the transaction_ID where month and date from transaction_date is shown. i also have a generate (Command27)button as trigger.Tried the code with few modifications, but it sequence doesnt populate, and doesnt show any, except for what i have in control for transaction_ID which is the “Format(transaction_date,”yyyy-mm”) & “-” & Format(sequence,”000″)” and this only shows the year and date, so instead of 2015-08-001 it shows 2015-08-.

Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers
NCR (no carbon required) or carbonless forms, like the name suggests, have eliminated the need for carbon paper between sheets to create multiple copies of the same form. The paper is chemically treated to transfer the impression from the first page to the subsequent pages with very little pressure. This works because the bottom side of carbonless NCR paper is coated with micro-encapsulated dye that breaks when pressed. The top of the susequent sheet is coated with clay that reacts with the dye to form a permanent mark. When the top sheet is written on, the pressure causes the micro-capsules to break and release the dye onto the page beneath it.
As more highways were built, states and countries began to experiment with distance-based (mile-based or kilometer-based) exit numbers. The first mile-based system known was implemented on the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey in the late 1950s. Michigan also implemented mile-based junction numbers on Interstate 94 in the 1960s. In this system, the number of miles from the beginning of the highway to the exit is used for the exit number. If two exits would end up with the same number, the numbers are sometimes modified slightly; this is often impossible and exits are given sequential or directional suffixes, just as with sequential numbers.
you'd need to use a before save macro. Something like the macro at the end - but it would run on every save, which may not be what you want. I use a macro that gets the invoice # and saves (it does several things). I added a button to the ribbon that calls a macro that runs several macros: Sub FinalizeInvoice() CreateInvoiceNumber CopyToExcel FinalCleanup ' this does the save End Sub This is an automated macro - but it will run every time the file is saved. Private WithEvents App As Word.Application Private Sub Document_Open() Set App = Word.Application… Read more »
When I want to add page numbers, I only get a number on page One (or on whatever page I'm on) and nowhere else. I tried everything. When I go to Page Number Setting and change it to start at page 2 and want to add page numbers to all pages, nothing happens if I stand on page 1, or I get a number on whatever page I'm on. But only there. Am I supposed to do all pages one by one?

I make the design with as many up as I need on the master page, linking the frames where the numbers will go. Then I make the list using Excel, copy paste to ID and apply a paragraph style with "start in next frame" option. Click the outbox on the pasted text to get a loaded cursor and delete the frame. Then just shift-click over the first textframe on a live page to have as many "tickets" added as needed automatically.


If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.
NCR booklets for receipt forms and invoice forms are very handy as a copy of the form can be easily torn from the booklet and given to the customer, while leaving a copy in the booklet for the business. Pages are perforated for easy removal. A sturdy cover wrap maintains the booklet’s integrity and can be inserted between forms to prevent transfer when completing the form.

If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.


An exit can be numbered by where the exit in the direction of increased mileage leaves the freeway, or by where the road that the exit serves crosses the freeway (which is occasionally ambiguous). From this number, the integer exit number can be determined by rounding up, rounding down, or rounding to the nearest integer. Many jurisdictions prefer to avoid an exit 0.[citation needed] To this end, the numbers are either rounded up to get the exit number, or any exit that would get the number 0 is instead numbered 1. Examples of highways with an exit 0 are British Columbia Highway 1 on the mainland, Interstate 70 in Wheeling, West Virginia along the West Virginia–Ohio border, and Interstate 90 on the Montana side of the Idaho–Montana border.
Angie, have tried your method; however, I encountered what I surmised was a limit on the amount of characters allowed in that “Enter formatting for number” box: for instance, I can only type as far as “Request for Productio” (excluding quotations)- additional text and codes delete and default back to the incomplete phrase “Request for Productio”. Seems to have a default of 26 characters – anything exceeding that is deleted. The phrase “Request for Admission” completes, but am unable to include anything after that phrase of 26 characters. Not sure why that is, but that’s what I run into when I attempt using the multi-list option.
What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in Microsoft Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. "Mike C" wrote in message news:BC4F1F10-A96C-4EC7-9E33-670828E53A0A@microsoft.com... > What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in > Microsoft > Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. Google or the online help would be your friend on this one. There's no fixed limit, there's only the limit on the overall size of the database file...
So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.
You want to do this because your document is long and readers can’t easily find the tables/figures they want as numbers like Table 34 are meaningless unless you find the table captions before/after ‘Table 34’. By changing the numbering sequence to include the chapter numbers, your readers will have guideposts to aid their search — if they are in Section 5, they will know that Table 3.2 is back in Section 3 and is the second table in that section.
By default, bullets and numbers inherit some of their text formatting from the first character in the paragraph to which they’re attached. If the first character in one paragraph is different from the first characters in other paragraphs, the numbering or bullet character may appear inconsistent with the other list items. If this is not the formatting you desire, create a character style for numbers or bullets and apply it to your list by using the Bullets And Numbering dialog box.
The partial sums themselves form a sequence {\displaystyle (S_{N})_{N\in \mathbb {N} }} , which is called the sequence of partial sums of the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} . If the sequence of partial sums converges, then we say that the series {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}} is convergent, and the limit {\displaystyle \lim _{N\to \infty }S_{N}} is called the value of the series. The same notation is used to denote a series and its value, i.e. we write {\displaystyle \sum _{n=1}^{\infty }a_{n}=\lim _{N\to \infty }S_{N}} .
I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the number of copies each time I print? Hi you could record a macro while doing this manually and assign a shortcut or button to this recorded macro -- Regards Frank Kabel Frankfurt, Germany Hebert45 wrote: > I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. > Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the > number of copies each time I print? ...
As more highways were built, states and countries began to experiment with distance-based (mile-based or kilometer-based) exit numbers. The first mile-based system known was implemented on the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey in the late 1950s. Michigan also implemented mile-based junction numbers on Interstate 94 in the 1960s. In this system, the number of miles from the beginning of the highway to the exit is used for the exit number. If two exits would end up with the same number, the numbers are sometimes modified slightly; this is often impossible and exits are given sequential or directional suffixes, just as with sequential numbers.
×