Creating a sequential list of numbers, in Word, sounds like an intimidating task. Sure, you can create a numbered list quickly enough, but that feature works with additional text - you're numbering something. If you want a list of just numbers, you have to work a bit harder. Word's SEQ field might come to mind, but that solution is better suited to template-type numbering. In order words, this field works great if you're numbering documents, labels, and so on. It doesn't work so well if you just want to create a list of sequential numbers. You can use it that way, but it'll be more work than it's worth.
Running captions number figures, tables, and other items consecutively in a document. For example, the first figure caption starts with the words “Figure 1,” the second with “Figure 2,” and so on. To make sure that figures, tables, or similar items are numbered consecutively, define a list for the item, and then create a paragraph style that includes the list definition. You can also add descriptive words such as “Figure” or “Table” to the numbering scheme of the paragraph style.
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.

Add numbers by inserting the same identifier at another location. Alternatively, copy the first one, select it and press “F9” to update the display. As a third option, you can use the keyboard shortcut “Ctrl-F9” and type “SEQ” and your identifier between the braces that appear. For instance, insert “{SEQ mynum}.” Press “F9” to update the field and enable the number to display.


In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
Set up a matrix in Excel, one column for each ticket position (stack) and one row for each sheet, plus one for field names. Fill the first column down in consecutive order, then the second, starting where the first column leaves off, and so on. Afet a couple of columns are filled, you can auto fill across the rows, too, so the whole thing takes only a couple of minutes. Name the stacks and use a different field for each position on the page when you do the merge. The trick is to set up using a custom file for the total number of tickets or whatever, divided into the correct number of stacks and sheets.

Most European countries use sequential numbering schemes. Spain uses distance-based numbering on its Autovias, but not on its Autopistas. Austria and the Czech Republic use distance-based schemes. A number of European countries (including the Netherlands, Belgium and France) do not number motorway intersections, apparently because one cannot "exit" the motorway there. Countries like Germany and Switzerland have attributed numbers to their exit, but instead of the usual exit symbol, they are given a specific interchange symbol.
To use mail merge to create a batch of gift certificates or coupons with tracking numbers, you need to set up a data source that contains a column listing the tracking numbers. If you plan to add only the tracking numbers to your publications, create a data source for the tracking numbers. If you also plan to use mail merge to insert additional information into your publications, such as customer names or addresses, you can add the column of tracking numbers to a data source that also lists the name and address data that you want to use.
I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.
To define a sequence by recursion, one needs a rule to construct each element in terms of the ones before it. In addition, enough initial elements must be provided so that all subsequent elements of the sequence can be computed by the rule. The principle of mathematical induction can be used to prove that in this case, there is exactly one sequence that satisfies both the recursion rule and the initial conditions. Induction can also be used to prove properties about a sequence, especially for sequences whose most natural description is recursive.
You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.
What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in Microsoft Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. "Mike C" wrote in message news:BC4F1F10-A96C-4EC7-9E33-670828E53A0A@microsoft.com... > What is the max number of records that can be put into a table in > Microsoft > Access? Does it vary from version to version? Thanks in advance. Google or the online help would be your friend on this one. There's no fixed limit, there's only the limit on the overall size of the database file...

LION also carries a heavy-duty, 6 wheel automatic numbering machine with rubber faced wheels. The rubber wheels work great for metal marking and plastic marking when used with LION fast dry ink. As with the other LION numbering machines, this machine is made in Japan with precision crafted one-piece hardened steel frame with all metal interior construction. LION machines will provide years of reliable use. Ideal for sequential numbering operations to use as a date and number stamp, serial number stamp, an inspection stamp and etc. sequential numbering in publisher
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