Standard sizes for NCR forms are half page (5.5″ x 8.5″), full page (8.5″ x 11″) and legal (8.5″ x 14″) although custom sizes can be ordered to meet your specific need. The design orientation can be either vertical or horizontal. The link below gives you access to design templates that can be used to lay out your form in the appropriate size and orientation.
In a legal document, it's rare for every paragraph in the document to be numbered. Usually, you change between numbered paragraphs and non-numbered (plain) paragraphs of text. When Word sees you switching between these types of formats, it usually tries to help by restarting your numbered list back at "1" (or the first value of your list, such as "A"). There are a few different ways to make the number follow the last number of your paragraphs. In Word, this is called Continue from Previous List.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.

Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.


Hello! I would like to chart varying salaries against specific Low, middle and high numbers. Any suggestions on how to show this? Example: Salary 1 10000 Salary 2 12000 Salary 3 16000 Low 9000 Mid 15000 High 19000 THANK YOU! Do you want the Low-Mid-High values to be like a benchmark to measure salaries against? You could put horizontal lines across your chart, and use markers for the salary data. Here' a few ways to get your lines: http://peltiertech.com/Excel/Charts/AddLine.html - Jon ------- Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP Peltier Technical Services Tutorials... sequential numbering
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