Simply copy the second page of the template by highlighting that page and pressing CTRL + C. Windows shortcut keys Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Keyboard shortcuts can save you hours of time. Master the universal Windows keyboard shortcuts, keyboard tricks for specific programs, and a few other tips to speed up your work. Read More are wonderful things. Then create a new blank page by pressing CTRL + Enter. Then paste the copied page using CTRL + V. Create a new blank page, and paste again. Keep doing this until you have the desired number of pages that you will need.
I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the number of copies each time I print? Hi you could record a macro while doing this manually and assign a shortcut or button to this recorded macro -- Regards Frank Kabel Frankfurt, Germany Hebert45 wrote: > I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. > Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the > number of copies each time I print? ...
Some sequential exits are renumbered (remaining sequential) due to added exits. For instance, the Hutchinson River Parkway in New York was renumbered so that its northernmost exit, 27, became 30. However, the Merritt Parkway, which continued the Hutchinson's exit numbers in Connecticut, was not renumbered. This means the Route 120A interchange is numbered 27 in Connecticut and 30 in New York.
I make the design with as many up as I need on the master page, linking the frames where the numbers will go. Then I make the list using Excel, copy paste to ID and apply a paragraph style with "start in next frame" option. Click the outbox on the pasted text to get a loaded cursor and delete the frame. Then just shift-click over the first textframe on a live page to have as many "tickets" added as needed automatically.
The Artifact ID should NOT be your PK. There is no reason for it to be and to try and use it as such will be a headache. A primary key is simply a unique identifier for a record. Many purists will tell you that users should never see the PK and in your case, I would recommend that. Use an Autonumber as you PK and you can use that as your corresponding Foreign Key in related records. To prevent duplication you can make the combination of Collection Point ID and Artifact ID a unique, multi-field index. Then display the combination as I indicated where you need to show the user a record ID. This is all explained int he blog.

The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
I to, have read through your directions while using both mac & pc platforms. I fail to find the “standard features” screen shots that you show above in either program. I too have spent several hours trying to get the sequential 3-up numbering as described. In trying to produce 300 tickets, I can get all of the first numbered position to be sequential over 100 pages. But, when moving down to the second or third ticket position on the page and setting up the numbering, I repeatedly find that I get a repeat of the first 100 numbers. I am lost as to how to proceed. Is there any other missing step or info that I am assumed to have knowledge about that was not mentioned above? If you know of some other site that might explain this process any better, please post. Thanks for your help.
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
Other examples of sequences include ones made up of rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers. The sequence (.9, .99, .999, .9999, ...) approaches the number 1. In fact, every real number can be written as the limit of a sequence of rational numbers, e.g. via its decimal expansion. For instance, π is the limit of the sequence (3, 3.1, 3.14, 3.141, 3.1415, ...). A related sequence is the sequence of decimal digits of π, i.e. (3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, ...). This sequence does not have any pattern that is easily discernible by eye, unlike the preceding sequence, which is increasing.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
You can change the numbers in the list by restarting the sequence or by specifying a new start number. You can change the list's style. You can do anything to this list that you can do to a normal numbered list because it is a numbered list, with one exception: the list, while easy to format, is fixed. If you delete an item, the list updates accordingly, but I haven't found a way to add numbers.
×