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That’s it! From now on, all you have to do to add SEQ field numbering is either type in your AutoCorrect text (1] and n]) or select the options from your Quick Parts list. If you find your numbering gets out of whack (remember, the numbers don’t update when you insert a new number between two existing numbers, or delete a number), select the sequence and press F9 (Hint: To update all fields for the entire document, press Ctrl+A then F9).

I am having trouble with this procedure. My situation is almost identical to example #2. I want to populate RecordNumber on my form with a date number like “130001, 130002, etc.” where “13” is the year based on a date automatically generated in the OpenDate field in tblLogRecords. OpenDate is a date/time type field that has a default value of the date the record is created and is not editable. I have added a field called Sequence to tblLogRecords and it is a Number, Long Integer type. I also created a bound control for Sequence on my form. I have a completely separate autonumber field as the PK.
 I'm looking for a script for Laserfiche Forms that will query a database and pull the next number in sequence and display it as the unique identifier for this document.  Once this number has been used, the number should not be used again.  This is similar to what the Submission ID is, but from what I can gather, this number is assigned after the submission takes place.  

Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.


My issue is trying to create small dot labels or equivalent to make up sequential alpha numeric labels to identify each individual item that I have in my shop, retrospectively. I have possibly 6-8thousand individual items that need coding for stock take purposes yet I can find no outlet that supply such thing. Do you have any suggestions. My line is antiques/collectables, predominantly china with items ranging in size from 2-3cm to 5/600cm. I would be most grateful for any solutions or suggestions. Best regards. Pete.

LION also carries a heavy-duty, 6 wheel automatic numbering machine with rubber faced wheels. The rubber wheels work great for metal marking and plastic marking when used with LION fast dry ink. As with the other LION numbering machines, this machine is made in Japan with precision crafted one-piece hardened steel frame with all metal interior construction. LION machines will provide years of reliable use. Ideal for sequential numbering operations to use as a date and number stamp, serial number stamp, an inspection stamp and etc.
The Artifact ID should NOT be your PK. There is no reason for it to be and to try and use it as such will be a headache. A primary key is simply a unique identifier for a record. Many purists will tell you that users should never see the PK and in your case, I would recommend that. Use an Autonumber as you PK and you can use that as your corresponding Foreign Key in related records. To prevent duplication you can make the combination of Collection Point ID and Artifact ID a unique, multi-field index. Then display the combination as I indicated where you need to show the user a record ID. This is all explained int he blog.
We recently had to print 500 numbered tickets 8 up on 8.5 x 11. When we took it back to Bindery they would have had to hand collate the tickets back in order after the cut. So we came up with a way that when each stack was cut they would simply be stack on top of each other. We couldn’t figure out a way to add 8 sets of grouped numbers to 8-up layout so I had to go into the txt file and number it manually. It worked fine but took a little time. Is there an option to pull 8 different sets of numbers to one page?
The new SQL stored procedure lookup rules in Forms 9.1 make doing something like this possible. The example in the online help shows how to use a stored procedure to auto-append an incrementing number from the database to a form when it loads, which might solve some of your problems. However, the number is incremented after the form loads (not when it is submitted), so that might not exactly fit your needs. Here's the link to the correct page of the online help.

Add specific codes to coupons to track customer responses     Use different codes for your different marketing messages, advertisements, or promotions. These codes will enable you to keep track of how customers learned about your offer. The more you learn about who is drawn to your business and what attracts customers' attention, the better you can focus future marketing efforts.

A subsequence of a given sequence is a sequence formed from the given sequence by deleting some of the elements without disturbing the relative positions of the remaining elements. For instance, the sequence of positive even integers (2, 4, 6, ...) is a subsequence of the positive integers (1, 2, 3, ...). The positions of some elements change when other elements are deleted. However, the relative positions are preserved.


I’d like to use this for Exhibits/Appedices. If we refer to the same Exhibit # in a footnote or elsewhere in the document, and then the Exhibit reference is moved, it causes an error in the footnote or reference. Is there a way to cross-reference this, or to have it cross-reference automatically? Lawyers want to use this but I can’t see them bothering to cross-reference the footnotes. Thanks.
An overwhelming majority of companies use designation-based part-numbering systems. A Design Management Procedure, for example, may be numbered as SOP 4.4-1. With the previous revision of the ISO 9001 standard, it meant that this document related to the element 4.4, design management. Well, it does not mean the same with the new ISO 9001 revision, simply because design management clause now has a different number: 7.3. What is the solution? The solution is simple: no part numbers, and no designators!
This difference is not simply a case of syntax. In order to provide a large workspace, conventional spreadsheets extend a table in X and Y to form a very large grid – ideally infinite, but normally limited to some smaller dimension.[N 2] Some of these cells, selected by the user, hold data. Data is manipulated using formulas, which are placed in other cells in the same sheet and output their results back into the formula cell’s display. The rest of the sheet is “sparse”, currently unused.[5] Sheets often grow very complex with input data, intermediate values from formulas and output areas, separated by blank areas. In order to manage this complexity, Excel allows one to hide data that is not of interest,[6] often intermediate values. Quattro Pro commonly introduced the idea of multiple sheets in a single book, allowing further subdivision of the data.
You want to do this because your document is long and readers can’t easily find the tables/figures they want as numbers like Table 34 are meaningless unless you find the table captions before/after ‘Table 34’. By changing the numbering sequence to include the chapter numbers, your readers will have guideposts to aid their search — if they are in Section 5, they will know that Table 3.2 is back in Section 3 and is the second table in that section.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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