Works great with desktop printers or high speed digital printers. Merges numbering with .pdf .tif and .bmp graphic files allowing the user to print and number a job in one pass. A real money maker for jobs that just aren’t cost effective to print on press! Try it before you buy. We have provided fully functional demos for you to download. You can make sure that our software will be right for you. Once you’re satisfied, place your order on our secure server.


@Andy: I’m sorry that I sounded dismissive. That wasn’t my intent. Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing.
* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
If {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of complex numbers rather than a sequence of real numbers, this last formula can still be used to define convergence, with the provision that {\displaystyle |\cdot |} denotes the complex modulus, i.e. {\displaystyle |z|={\sqrt {z^{*}z}}} . If {\displaystyle (a_{n})} is a sequence of points in a metric space, then the formula can be used to define convergence, if the expression {\displaystyle |a_{n}-L|} is replaced by the expression {\displaystyle {\text{dist}}(a_{n},L)} , which denotes the distance between {\displaystyle a_{n}} and {\displaystyle L} .
Ontario has the oldest exit number system, having started posting exit numbers sequentially in the 1960s along Highway 401; it switched to mile-based numbering before Canada went metric. Most short freeways do not have exit numbers, and until about 2000 (with Highways 11 and 69/400), incomplete freeways also did not have exit numbers. Interchanges with multiple exits are lettered A-B.

For example, in our law practice, we submit briefs with hundreds of attachments. Those attachments are constantly being reorganized (thus renumbered) and we had to develop a scheme to keep each attachment (and reference to each attachment) organized and accurate. We created a master list of attachments, and captured the dynamic field code in a bookmark. We can then cross-reference to that bookmark (which will return a number) through our documents. Example Public Attachment 68 (where 68 represents a field sequence code, is captured in a bookmark we will call SR_112). The bookmark name is a code name supplied by the drafting lawyer. That way, when the lawyer refers throughout the document to Public Attachment ___, we insert a cross reference to bookmark SR_112, and it always returns an accurate number, even if we reorganize the order of our attachments.
I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel. I then let InDesign CS4 do the merging. Here’s the formula.
You can define a section prefix to label section pages automatically. For example, if you specify A– for Section Prefix on page 16 of a document and include the section prefix, the page will appear in the table of contents or index as A–16. Text you type for a section marker appears when you choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Section Marker.
I’d like to use this for Exhibits/Appedices. If we refer to the same Exhibit # in a footnote or elsewhere in the document, and then the Exhibit reference is moved, it causes an error in the footnote or reference. Is there a way to cross-reference this, or to have it cross-reference automatically? Lawyers want to use this but I can’t see them bothering to cross-reference the footnotes. Thanks.
Here, you’ll be given the chance to name your AutoText entry. Name it carefully — for AutoText to work correctly, the first four letters of each of your AutoText entry names will need to be distinct, since these first four letters will be the prompt for Word to offer to complete the phrase for you. My suggestion is to use Interrogatories, Production and Admission as your names, but use whatever is convenient and memorable for you.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

Specifically, 8 to 10 times in my career, I have set up a robust set of MS Word “Auto Text Entries.” Some, short phrases as in this article (e.g. “Interrogatory No. __,” “Long Corporate Name of Client, Inc.,” etc.). Some large blocks of text, paragraphs, or formatting chunks (e.g. Memorandum Start (To:, From:, Date:, Subject: etc.); Caption Block for [Local] Court; Signature Block; Certificate of Service, etc.).

Here is my problem. i have a series of 3 digit numbers that need to be cinverted to a series of 4 digit numbers using this following 722 needs to read as 5622 and in the next collum SV-7822 in the collum's to the right. what type of formula is this and how can i do it? The above is an example, i have a whole range of 3 digit numbers that need the exact. rules applied to all numbers. which is why i need a formula to do it. Help someone please!!!! I'm not completely clear on what your looking for but if 722 was in A1 in B1: = A1 + 4900 in B2: = ="SV-" & A1 + 7100...

Using the instructions in #5, add an incrementing SEQ field. You can highlight any of them, except the reset field. For step 7, enter n}. n is the default switch that inserts the next number in the sequence, making it easy to remember. You don't have to specify the \n switch, because it's the default, but you can add it if it helps document your choice.


Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
 I'm looking for a script for Laserfiche Forms that will query a database and pull the next number in sequence and display it as the unique identifier for this document.  Once this number has been used, the number should not be used again.  This is similar to what the Submission ID is, but from what I can gather, this number is assigned after the submission takes place.  
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