Sequential exit numbering usually begins with exit 1 at the beginning of the road; each subsequent exit is given the next number. Letter suffixes are commonly used when new exits are added. For example, on the New York State Thruway, an exit was added between 21 and 22, and was given the number 21A. Subsequently, a new exit was added between 21 and 21A, leading to the sequence 21 - 21B - 21A - 22. In Florida, some new exits got the suffix C, so that if it had or acquired separate exits for the two directions, they would be 15CA and 15CB rather than 15AB. There are also occurrences of this happening on the New Jersey Turnpike; the original interchanges opened in 1951, with newer exits as recently as 1982. On the Baltimore Beltway, there is an exit 12B-C (MD 372), as well as 12A (US 1). There is also an exit 8A (I-895) and an exit 8 (MD 168).
This actually has nothing to do with linking or unlinking of headers or footers but with restarting numbering (which can be done without unlinking). In any section where there is a jump in the numbering, go to Insert | Header & Footer | Page Number | Format Page Numbers.... In the Page Number Format dialog, change the "Page numbering" setting from "Start at" to "Continue from previous section."

First, you have to use YOUR field and control names. The ones I use are samples. The error you are getting indicated you do not have a control named txtProject. So you have to substitute the correct name of the control. bound to the ProjectID field. By the way it is not a good idea to the octothorpe(#) as part of a field name. A controlname may be different from a fieldname. The name property of a control is on the Other tab in the Properties dialog.
Scott, I had posted on Microsoft and you sent me to your blog to have the numbering system (similar to APEX example) explained. I am not a programmer and I don’t understand where these codes and expressions are even suppose to go in access. When I do try to implement the little I do know I continue to get errors. I am not sure if I am putting the information in the wrong place or if I am way off. Do you know of any youtube videos that could walk me through it step by step? Or if you have the time could you help walk me through the steps.
Creating a sequential list of numbers, in Word, sounds like an intimidating task. Sure, you can create a numbered list quickly enough, but that feature works with additional text - you're numbering something. If you want a list of just numbers, you have to work a bit harder. Word's SEQ field might come to mind, but that solution is better suited to template-type numbering. In order words, this field works great if you're numbering documents, labels, and so on. It doesn't work so well if you just want to create a list of sequential numbers. You can use it that way, but it'll be more work than it's worth.
Scott, I was able to try this as I assumed that is what I needed to do. It does not work. First, the current macro for that button is a Save Record, Close Window operation. How could I keep this and also add Code? If I just add a new button to the form and under the On Click Event put the code you suggested, I get a compile error of “method or data member not found” and ” .txtPROJECT” is highlighted. The actual field is “PROJECT ID#” and it is a long integer number. Entry I have is: Private Sub Command88_Click()
Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.
Some freeways' exit number starts from a advanced number (i.e. higher than 1). Some reason of starting a number higher than 1 is due to the expectation that the highway will extend on both ends. For example, Ontario Highway 400 starts at 20 because it was expected that the south end of the highway would extend to downtown Toronto (which was never built). Another reason to use a higher number is that the freeway is branching off from another freeway. An example is British Columbia Highway 5, which branches off British Columbia Highway 1 and starts at 170.

I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
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