Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.
Adobe, I expected better! Hi Folks, I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel.
I am creating a file in inDesign for a client that is asking for numbered tickets. They'd like to be able to print a specific number for each ticket. I've read some of the older answers for similar questions that refer to Data Merge, but I'd prefer not to take that route if avoidable. What I'd ultimately like to do is create a space for the numbers to go, select the number of pages within the Print menu, and have the spaces populate with the corresponding numbers while printing.
Corel DrawLay out as many tickets per page. Number anywhere on the ticket.Number-Pro is also used to print multi form document like invoices.This is a great application to have in a small to medium sized print shop as well. If you or your shop does not have the ability to perforate paper and card stock, it can usually be bought at a local wholesale paper supplier or online like perforatedpaper.comNow raffle ticket numbering is within the capabilities of everyone from the home, do-it-yourselfer, organizations wanting to do fundraising and print shops of all sizes. Number Pro is a true raffle ticket number generator
Numbered tickets are a bitch in InDesign. Mainly because if the RIP time. I've found that what I have to do is do two runs. One run of just the tickets with the blank area for the numbers. Then I put those back through the copier to print the numbers on them. You want to set up an excel sheet with just one set of your numbers. Not 1, 1, 2, 2. Just 1-3000. Then you create the text boxes for the numbers for the first ticket and draw a text box that is the exact size of the ticket around and send it to the background. Then do a mail merge. You will grab the mail merge name of the column and drop it into each text box so each text box will have the name of your column (like <>). That means that being the same, each number will go into each box so the first ticket will get number 1 and number 1. Then you do the mail merge doing multiple entries per page or whatever it's called and it will create all the pages needed. So you will end up with a 375 page document to create 3000 total tickets based on an 8 up.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.

An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
I am trying to create raffle tickets, 4 on a page with only a number on the stub. My problem is when I get to the print preview and change it to "multiple pages per sheet" it is just changing the number on the next page and not on the next ticket. I followed all the directions on adding the number to each ticket from the merge document (of course all the step by step information I can find is only for 2007 and NOT 2013 so guessing there is something wrong with what I am doing).  When I go into the print screen it is also changing my paper from 8 1/2 x 11 to 11 x 17 and putting 8 on the page.

Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.
Nowadays when you explore the internet you will be bewildered by the number of Word templates which has in itself several varieties of event tickets for you to use conveniently. Microsoft Word gives you options to avail those tickets as they appear on the template or you can make it creative, artistic and alluring at your wits’ imaginative power. You can even slot in images for a better appeal!
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)

Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.

• On the document page, override the items by Command/Ctrl-Shift-dragging over them (or clicking on them). • Select that one page and duplicate it in the Pages panel, or by choosing Layout > Pages > Duplicate Spread. • Select the original page and the duplicate and then copy those. Repeat this (select pages and duplicate) until you have enough pages. Unfortunately, InDesign isn’t exactly speedy at updating these numbers when you add a bunch of pages.
Like a charm! I can choose how many zero how many out I need and if there are special versions I can separate them too! Thank you, I was just about to run screaming from the building! All the “solutions” mentioned on this page are great examples of a great irritation in the graphics industry: When offering solutions, PLEASE mention the platform you are using and save people some frustration; what works great for you on a PC may not work at all on a Mac. What options you see on your version of Indesign are NOT cross-platform and Corel is strictly a Windows application. Thus we get puzzled responses from those who can’t understand why someone cannot grasp what they see as a simple process.
I then numbered two rows across 1 -4, then 5 -8. Then I dropped down to A – H in row 260. (I did this to give 1,000+ numbered tickets.) I then used the Excel fill function chosing series and told the program to skip by 4. It filled the rows. I then saved as a tab delimited text file. In InDesign CS4, I set the tickets four up on the master page. On page 1, I positioned my merge fields such that ticket1 was directly above stub1, ticket 2 directly above stub 2, etc.
     One of the most profitable products a small print shop can produce is Raffle Tickets. But the trouble is most small to medium sized print shops either don't have a numbering unit or it is not setup to number multiple documents on a single sheet of paper. Most print shops do however have a laserjet or multi purpose printer. Combine that with some graphic software like Publisher and and easy to use numbering software program and you can capture the raffle ticket business and not let it slip away from you.
The trick is this: I creat an 'template' of the card, somewhere outside of the page. All object for data are text object, with all the formating needed. In place of the photo is an rectangle. The script read an text file (CSV) with the database, duplicate all template object, one by one and replace string in text object with the string from DB and import photo in place of the rectangle, redimension and convert to RGB or CMYK, acording to the initial data (atach.) When the page is full, create another one.
The trick is this: I creat an 'template' of the card, somewhere outside of the page. All object for data are text object, with all the formating needed. In place of the photo is an rectangle. The script read an text file (CSV) with the database, duplicate all template object, one by one and replace string in text object with the string from DB and import photo in place of the rectangle, redimension and convert to RGB or CMYK, acording to the initial data (atach.) When the page is full, create another one.
As far as threading the frames, is it that you don't understand threading? You accomplish that by using the selection tool to click in the outport box (the larger square near the lower right corner of the text frame), then clicking inside the frame you want to be next in the thread. Repeat as often as required, selecting the outport of the last frame you threaded each time. Text will now flow automatically from the first frame to the end of the thread. You can work backwards, too, if you wish, by selecting the inport (upper left) instead of the outport.
The task of producing numbered tickets in Microsoft Word might seem pretty tough and strenuous especially for those people who are not skilled and trained in using Word files. There are quite a lot of people who have been left disappointed, disheartened and exasperated by their failures in attempting to explore how to create tickets for an event using Word templates. Many unanswered queries, doubts and confusions might have stood in the path of your success.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
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