But it’s not hard to duplicate and reduplicate until you have a thousand or more numbered tickets. I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count. I handle this much differently. I create a number list in Excel and save as a txt file.
Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document.
I had wanted to create a file that didn't require Excel as the data source, so I created one using SEQ fields. It was terrible and too huge to mention (thanks Doug Robbins), so I recreated it using Word as the data source so that people who only have Word can use it. You can create up to 5,000 tickets without changing the data file. If you only have Word and need to create more than 5,000 tickets, please don't type the ticket numbers. Just drop me an email and I'll create another data file for you with the required numbers.
Simply copy the second page of the template by highlighting that page and pressing CTRL + C. Windows shortcut keys Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Keyboard shortcuts can save you hours of time. Master the universal Windows keyboard shortcuts, keyboard tricks for specific programs, and a few other tips to speed up your work. Read More are wonderful things. Then create a new blank page by pressing CTRL + Enter. Then paste the copied page using CTRL + V. Create a new blank page, and paste again. Keep doing this until you have the desired number of pages that you will need.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.

You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”


But it’s not hard to duplicate and reduplicate until you have a thousand or more numbered tickets. I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count. I handle this much differently. I create a number list in Excel and save as a txt file.
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You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).
The task of producing numbered tickets in Microsoft Word might seem pretty tough and strenuous especially for those people who are not skilled and trained in using Word files. There are quite a lot of people who have been left disappointed, disheartened and exasperated by their failures in attempting to explore how to create tickets for an event using Word templates. Many unanswered queries, doubts and confusions might have stood in the path of your success.
It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.
I have done this twice now, getting flustered. The ticket part the person keeps has the correct sequential number on it, but the side that we keep has the same number on it for the whole page. What part am I missing, at first I did not uncheck the box, but this time I did but have the same number on the stub side that we keep with the person's name, etc
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