Our raffle ticket templates have a placeholder for a ticket number, usually “xxx” to remind you it needs to be replaced. Select it, click Insert Merge Field > Ticket. Do the same for the second ticket number placeholder. Most tickets will have two number placeholders because one part of the ticket is for the raffle host (you) and the other is for the purchaser.


@Andy: I’m sorry that I sounded dismissive. That wasn’t my intent. Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing.
The EASY way to set up the text file is to use Excel to make a grid the number of sheets wide by the number of tickets per sheet deep. Put the first number in the upper left cell, then fill consecutively to the right until the number of columns is equal to the number of sheets you will print, then move down a row and do the same thing with the next numbers, and so on until you've finished the grid.
Thank you for the explanation. Yes, our digital machine (Minolta Bizhub) does have a variable data module, however the support folks do not seem to be able to successfully get it to number in the correct order for output to print and stack properly for our needs. Indesign works great in this manor but with the quirps we are discussing here. Anyway your assumption that I do not understand threads is true. I have never done "threading". I am going to focus on this next as you mentioned it is easier than data merge. We do numbering of carbonless forms, raffle and event tickets often here and so the "smoother" the better. Apparently my supervisor requires that I make it work with the tools at hand and will not "invest" in any "pricey" new programs.
Permalink Peter, I have done the "master" function successfully. It appears to work.I ran a form job to the press with a large quantity of numbers successfully. Thank you. A full color ticket job with only two hundred sheets did create a large file in my print que however, and feed very slowly. Can you tell me; Does Indesign still create an image for each sheet when printing? I am still a bit confused about the threading technique you mentioned. Would this create an easier feed to the printer or "smaller" file size?
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
The exciting thing about our templates is that you are free to customize them, they are easy to download, and you can use them over and over again. These templates will save you time and money and so easy to use, that you can grab yourself a cup of coffee, sit down, relax and create your raffle tickets. Remember you might find other uses for them as well, some may use this sequential numbering system to create price tags for bake sales, and garage sales. Indeed, anything you may require a ‘ticket’ for, you can customize our templates and make them work for you.
I’m quite inclined to let the printer add the numbers. Less file size for me, less plates for me. I recently sent an invite to a digital printers, I offered to lay it up with all the names, they rejected the idea and said they could merge the names in as it printed. I guess it’s down to what you’re going to use it for. But if you’re going to print them yourself then by all means, if it’s going to a printer, best to check with them before you send anything definite over.

Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
12. To build the document, you will add the first merge field, the room number. To do this, choose Room from the Field list box, and click Insert Print Merge Field. This will place the variable on the document. Next, choose Subject from the Field list box, and click Insert Print Merge Field once more. Now both variables are inserted in the CorelDRAW document.

Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.
With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.
(Ticket artwork courtesy of. Thanks, Mordy, for pointing out this site!) CS3 List Numbering A significantly more elegant way to handle numbering in InDesign is to use the autonumbering feature in CS3. (CS2 also has an paragraph numbering feature, but it’s not nearly as powerful.) First, create a numbering “list” by choosing Type > Bulleted & Numbered Lists > Define Lists. Then click New to create a new list. You can name it anything you want, but make sure the Continued Numbers across Stories is enabled: After you click OK and close the Define Lists dialog box, create a text frame and type any character (such as a space).
You need at least one space to make the autonumbering kick in. Now Option/Alt-click on the Autonumbering button in the Control panel (or choose Bullets and Numbering from the Control panel flyout menu) and choose the list you created in the Lists pop-up menu. You might want to adjust the other settings to match this: Now you’re done. Click OK and you should see the number appear in the text frame.
Number-Pro makes numbering raffle tickets and forms easy using your desktop publishing software like Indesign, Microsoft Word and Publisher and Corel Draw. Number Pro creates a data merge file based on your numbering requirements that can easily be integrated into the desktop publishing software that allows for printing directly to your small business or home printer.

Thank you for the explanation. Yes, our digital machine (Minolta Bizhub) does have a variable data module, however the support folks do not seem to be able to successfully get it to number in the correct order for output to print and stack properly for our needs. Indesign works great in this manor but with the quirps we are discussing here. Anyway your assumption that I do not understand threads is true. I have never done "threading". I am going to focus on this next as you mentioned it is easier than data merge. We do numbering of carbonless forms, raffle and event tickets often here and so the "smoother" the better. Apparently my supervisor requires that I make it work with the tools at hand and will not "invest" in any "pricey" new programs.

@Andy: I’m sorry that I sounded dismissive. That wasn’t my intent. Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing.
publishing software and Number-ProCan I use a regular desktop printer for raffle ticket numbering? Absolutely!With desktop publishing software like Adobe InDesign, Microsoft Word, Publisher or any application that allows you to do a "merge" and a stand alone software application like Number-Pro (www.number-pro.com) you can print your own raffle tickets with numbering or any other document you want to be numbered.The ease of using Number-Pro is that it can be used with any software that allows a file merge. This includes but not limited to:Adobe Indesign
Whether they're getting ready to win or ready to enter your big event, your guests will love the thrill of entering with our raffle tickets. Each ticket comes with a twin ticket, which means you get to keep one while they keep the other – there's no memorizing of entry numbers with these ticket! Also the number of the ticket remains with your patrons as long as the ticket does! Plus, with the great selection of colors we offer, the ticket isn't going to get lost any time soon.
×