@Andy: I’m sorry that I sounded dismissive. That wasn’t my intent. Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing.
Getting Word to put a unique number on each raffle ticket is easy enough, but persuading Word to print out several uniquely-numbered raffle tickets per sheet of paper is very hard (I think it is impossible, actually. At least I couldn't figure it out. UPDATE: I did figure it out. Instructions for printing raffle tickets using Microsoft Word are here.). And you don't really want to have every raffle ticket use up a whole sheet of paper.
Am I the only individual here who is using CS3, and trying the method described, only to find that my version (5.0.2) for the mac doesn’t have the options anywhere that the author suggests? I have spent the past 2 hours trying to find the same screenshots the author has, only to become reall discouraged. Perhaps he is using a windows version that is setup differently?

Neighborhood businesses: The shops and stores in your own community are great places to start selling your raffle tickets. These are locales you frequent, where you know the owners and are able talk to them while you’re there. The more familiar you are to them, the more likely they’ll support your fundraising efforts and will be willing provide a selling spot for you.
Add specific codes to coupons to track customer responses     Use different codes for your different marketing messages, advertisements, or promotions. These codes will enable you to keep track of how customers learned about your offer. The more you learn about who is drawn to your business and what attracts customers' attention, the better you can focus future marketing efforts.
You saved my life! I work at a School Board with 200+ schools and 100+ departments and I have to number every ticket I make. Football, Baseball, Raffles, Prom, Graduation… the list goes on. The worse part is each is different and has to have x number in this color that color it can be very frustrating. Then to top it off I have the most random number of requested tickets sometimes and it was extremely difficult to find a method that worked and yours did! Like a charm! I can choose how many zero how many out I need and if there are special versions I can separate them too! Thank you, I was just about to run screaming from the building!
OfficeArticles.com provides examples of Formulas, Functions and Visual Basic procedures for illustration only, without warranty either expressed or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose. The Formulas, Functions and Visual Basic procedures on this web site are provided "as is" and we do not guarantee that they can be used in all situations.
I basically used Bob Levine’s method (thanks) but wanted to add some extra detail – am using CS2 which is somewhat behind CS3 in this area. David, I was very discouraged to read your response to Josh on April 28th 2008. It seems your comment was quite dismissive to him with exactly no feedback help. He seemed to be looking for some more help trying to work through what you and the other InDesign gurus discuss as a “simple process”. I to, have read through your directions while using both mac & pc platforms. I fail to find the “standard features” screen shots that you show above in either program. I too have spent several hours trying to get the sequential 3-up numbering as described.
With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.
Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author! Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer.:-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed.
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
Hi - are you creating your own tickets using the instructions on this page? If so, you can of course change the font and everything else in your Word document. If you are using the Raffle Ticket Creator app (app.raffleticketcreator.com) then you can't change the font size ... you'll just need to tinker with the exact words that you are including in order to get them to fit on the page. Hope that helps!
×