The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets. ticket numbering
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
Thanks for the quick reply, I think I’m a little confused by the Display aspect of this. Artifact ID is a primary key to the table I am working in and I need it to have a unique identifier that other people can search for. The previously adopted naming convention for this ID is that which I mentioned before, Collection Point ID plus a period and then a sequential number restarting at each new Collection Point ID i.e 2-1050.1, 2-1050.2, 2-1060.1 and so on. So I think I actually need to save this in the Artifact ID field. I realize this might be slightly redundant but I’m not sure how the display would work as far as searching for specific Artifact IDs in the future.
WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
We run a big annual event, and have tried these tickets two years in a row. Same major defect for over a year - they put a product sticker on the outside of the roll, and the glue from the sticker seeps into the tickets and glues them together. We have had this happen on several rolls over multiple orders of fresh tickets, and it is not an isolated incident. You end up using about the first third of the roll, and then have to throw the rest away.

I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks....


Now for the slightly hard bit. If you just try and complete your merge now, you'll get several pages of tickets. Each page will have four tickets on it. But all tickets on any page will have the same number. Each page will have a different number, but all the tickets on that page will have the same number. That's no good. You need each ticket to have a different number.
×