Both the Collection Point ID and Artifact ID fields are bound properly and display those exact names in the property sheet under both control source and name. On the save button I have on the form, when I click on the event tab and the on click option I have event procedure and I click the […] option to open up the code builder and this is what I currently have:

There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
What I am trying to do is create sequential numbering in the Reference field that will assign a number based upon Account #.  In other words, if the Account # is 2208, the Reference field will equal 1 for both entries.  The next unique account number will be assigned "2", etc.  This is necessary so that the Reference number in our accounting system matches the Reference Number on the customer's invoice.
John, Sorry for the delay, but I was away last week with limited Internet access. I assumed if you had a Save button, you would know how to put code behind it. To see the code behind a button, Select the button in Form Design Mode and open the Properties Dialog (Right click and select properties), on the Events tab there should be something in the On Click event of the button. If you click the Ellipses […] next to the event, it will open Code Builder where you can enter the code.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
A sequence can be thought of as a list of elements with a particular order. Sequences are useful in a number of mathematical disciplines for studying functions, spaces, and other mathematical structures using the convergence properties of sequences. In particular, sequences are the basis for series, which are important in differential equations and analysis. Sequences are also of interest in their own right and can be studied as patterns or puzzles, such as in the study of prime numbers.
As more highways were built states began to experiment with distance-based (mile-based) exit numbers. The first mile-based system known was implemented on the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey in the late 1950s. Michigan also implemented mile-based junction numbers on Interstate 94 in the 1960s. In this system, the number of miles from the beginning of the highway to the exit is used for the exit number. If two exits would end up with the same number, the numbers are sometimes modified slightly; this is often impossible and exits are given sequential or directional suffixes, just as with sequential numbers.
If you make a list of things you need to do, starting with number 1 and continuing until all your tasks are accounted for, then you’ve made a sequential list. Something that is sequential often follows a numerical or alphabetical order, but it can also describe things that aren’t numbered but still need to take place in a logical order, such as the sequential steps you follow for running a program on your computer.
A quick search at the top using the term "document numbering" shows 46 different threads, with very good advice, for the most part.  I would first recommend you perform the same search and see what advice may be gleaned from those far older and wiser than myself.  In order to directly answer your question, I would refer you to the following discussion thread.  Many talk about the physical numbering system to use, which is important, and many discuss the frustration that a new person to the position feels when they inherit a mess from someone else and wish to clean it up. 
Numbered Ticket Printing is possible for digital printing. The ticket can be printed in full or single color for both front and back side, on a 100 lb. paper stock with gloss or matte coating. The perforation on the ticket is optional. Standard sizes available for ticket printing are 1.75" x 5.5", 2 x 7", and 2 x 11". Custom sizes are also offered.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.

An overwhelming majority of companies use designation-based part-numbering systems. A Design Management Procedure, for example, may be numbered as SOP 4.4-1. With the previous revision of the ISO 9001 standard, it meant that this document related to the element 4.4, design management. Well, it does not mean the same with the new ISO 9001 revision, simply because design management clause now has a different number: 7.3. What is the solution? The solution is simple: no part numbers, and no designators!


John, Sorry for the delay, but I was away last week with limited Internet access. I assumed if you had a Save button, you would know how to put code behind it. To see the code behind a button, Select the button in Form Design Mode and open the Properties Dialog (Right click and select properties), on the Events tab there should be something in the On Click event of the button. If you click the Ellipses […] next to the event, it will open Code Builder where you can enter the code.
The most important sequences spaces in analysis are the ℓp spaces, consisting of the p-power summable sequences, with the p-norm. These are special cases of Lp spaces for the counting measure on the set of natural numbers. Other important classes of sequences like convergent sequences or null sequences form sequence spaces, respectively denoted c and c0, with the sup norm. Any sequence space can also be equipped with the topology of pointwise convergence, under which it becomes a special kind of Fréchet space called an FK-space.

Thank you for these clear instructions. I have had the same problem as Mommy Vaughan and followed the suggestion. However, on re-opening the Word document, I have the dialogue box Invalid Merge Field. I have to use Task Manager to close down Word. I am using Word 2010. Maybe that is part or all of the problem. Any ideas please? I need to sort this by tomorrow night to print them on Monday!

×