1. On the first hand, you need to initiate Microsoft Publisher. You can view a magnifying glass icon and you need to hit inside the little field which shows Available Templates page. Now you should type the Word ‘tickets’ and move your cursor towards the magnifying glass icon. Hit on it. Subsequently you need to evaluate and assess the ticket options in the Microsoft Publisher. After that you can double click on the desired template. For example if you want to open the raffle ticket template just double click on it for the Publisher to open it for you.

Your raffle might be subject to gaming commission or tax laws. Check with your municipality, state or province, and federal governments to make sure your raffle is legal. These government departments aren’t just enforcers. They are often great resources on how to run a successful fund raising raffle. Raffles are fun! Getting in trouble with the law or tax man is not.
I basically used Bob Levine’s method (thanks) but wanted to add some extra detail – am using CS2 which is somewhat behind CS3 in this area. David, I was very discouraged to read your response to Josh on April 28th 2008. It seems your comment was quite dismissive to him with exactly no feedback help. He seemed to be looking for some more help trying to work through what you and the other InDesign gurus discuss as a “simple process”. I to, have read through your directions while using both mac & pc platforms. I fail to find the “standard features” screen shots that you show above in either program. I too have spent several hours trying to get the sequential 3-up numbering as described.
You’re selling raffle tickets to make money, so why buy the tickets pre-printed? Using Microsoft Word’s mail merge function, you can create your own raffle tickets and design them any way you please. A mail merge doesn’t have to make mail; it is simply a way to define certainly elements of a document, then automatically insert variable elements, such as raffle ticket numbers. The most important thing to remember is that each ticket needs a mate–you don’t want to pull winning ticket number 81018 only to find that no one bought that one.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.

PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.
Thank you very much, I will attempt to follow these directions and feed a job. I use a placed PDF that is already a 4 up layout for raffle tickets and usually require 2 placements of the number per ticket, total of 4 columns (2 each x 4)in text boxes and placed from an excel .csv file. I hope I can figure out how to make this work with your "easier method".

Hello Bruce, I seem to be having a different problem altogether. I created my ticket in word using logos and text boxes as needed, ticket looks great. I followed your very clear instructions but when I did the Finish & Merge I got this message, "You cannot include DATA, NEXT, NEXTIF, or SKIPIF fields in comments, headers, footers, footnotes or endnotes." I then click on OK and get this, "A field calculation error occurred in record 1. Bruce any help would be much appreciated. Thank you!!
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