OK, First, you need to reread the blog. You should NOT be storing the Transaction_ID. It is a calculated value. Second, your naming is what confused me. Your Passenger table should have an autonumber PassengerID. That PassengerID should be the Foreign Key in your Reservations table. Your servation table should also have an autonumber for ReservationID. I really don’t see why you need sequential numbering in the passenger table. I can understand it in the Reservations table, but not in the passenger table. Also, I don’t see any reason for a transaction date in the passenger table. I can understand a CreateDate for when the passenger signed up.
The event will set up certain prizes. Raffle tickets are then sold, and the people told to hold them until the raffle is held. Raffle tickets are then drawn randomly, and the holders of the winning tickets get a prize. While organizers can be as creative as they wish, offering bulk purchases of tickets and discounts, the basic rules stay the same. The benefit of holding raffles is that donors enjoy the anticipation of possibly winning a prize, while donating to a charity. This makes raffle tickets one of the most popular ways to earn for a nonprofit.
This leads to another often-ignored topic, that of file naming conventions.  What I mean by this is how and where you save the computer file in your computer system.  I know more than one company that has a policy that all documents must be approved by a specific person and the document isn't considered implemented until that person saves it up on the file server.  This is both good and bad, because MANY times I've seen that person receive random phone calls from upper managers within the company that didn't even try to look for a document - they just called that person and interrupted whatever they were doing in order to have them directed to the document.  If a person wants to be the single point of contact (SPOC) on document management, they might receive a few phone calls they didn't anticipate.  It may still be worth it.
In mathematics, a sequence is an enumerated collection of objects in which repetitions are allowed. Like a set, it contains members (also called elements, or terms). The number of elements (possibly infinite) is called the length of the sequence. Unlike a set, the same elements can appear multiple times at different positions in a sequence, and order matters. Formally, a sequence can be defined as a function whose domain is either the set of the natural numbers (for infinite sequences) or the set of the first n natural numbers (for a sequence of finite length n). The position of an element in a sequence is its rank or index; it is the natural number from which the element is the image. It depends on the context or a specific convention, if the first element has index 0 or 1. When a symbol has been chosen for denoting a sequence, the nth element of the sequence is denoted by this symbol with n as subscript; for example, the nth element of the Fibonacci sequence is generally denoted Fn.
What I am trying to do is create sequential numbering in the Reference field that will assign a number based upon Account #.  In other words, if the Account # is 2208, the Reference field will equal 1 for both entries.  The next unique account number will be assigned "2", etc.  This is necessary so that the Reference number in our accounting system matches the Reference Number on the customer's invoice.

There are a number of ways to denote a sequence, some of which are more useful for specific types of sequences. One way to specify a sequence is to list the elements. For example, the first four odd numbers form the sequence (1, 3, 5, 7). This notation can be used for infinite sequences as well. For instance, the infinite sequence of positive odd integers can be written (1, 3, 5, 7, ...). Listing is most useful for infinite sequences with a pattern that can be easily discerned from the first few elements. Other ways to denote a sequence are discussed after the examples.
Displays the number of the default numbering series assigned to the next business partner, item, or document to be created. You can change this number of a document series as long as no document is created within this series. If there already exist documents within the default numbering series, you can change the next number only for purchasing documents.
I am having trouble with this procedure. My situation is almost identical to example #2. I want to populate RecordNumber on my form with a date number like “130001, 130002, etc.” where “13” is the year based on a date automatically generated in the OpenDate field in tblLogRecords. OpenDate is a date/time type field that has a default value of the date the record is created and is not editable. I have added a field called Sequence to tblLogRecords and it is a Number, Long Integer type. I also created a bound control for Sequence on my form. I have a completely separate autonumber field as the PK.
I am having trouble with this procedure. My situation is almost identical to example #2. I want to populate RecordNumber on my form with a date number like “130001, 130002, etc.” where “13” is the year based on a date automatically generated in the OpenDate field in tblLogRecords. OpenDate is a date/time type field that has a default value of the date the record is created and is not editable. I have added a field called Sequence to tblLogRecords and it is a Number, Long Integer type. I also created a bound control for Sequence on my form. I have a completely separate autonumber field as the PK.
Most European countries use sequential numbering schemes. Spain uses distance-based numbering on its Autovias, but not on its Autopistas. Austria and the Czech Republic use distance-based schemes. A number of European countries (including the Netherlands, Belgium and France) do not number motorway intersections, apparently because one cannot "exit" the motorway there. Countries like Germany and Switzerland have attributed numbers to their exit, but instead of the usual exit symbol, they are given a specific interchange symbol.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
A sequence can be thought of as a list of elements with a particular order. Sequences are useful in a number of mathematical disciplines for studying functions, spaces, and other mathematical structures using the convergence properties of sequences. In particular, sequences are the basis for series, which are important in differential equations and analysis. Sequences are also of interest in their own right and can be studied as patterns or puzzles, such as in the study of prime numbers.

Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word's numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you'll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.


That’s enough tips for now. You’ll be filling your fundraising thermometer template How to Create Your Custom Excel Fundraising Thermometer Template How to Create Your Custom Excel Fundraising Thermometer Template Use an Excel thermometer chart to visually keep track of your financial goals. Whether you're saving for a new gadget or fundraising for a good cause, here's a step by step tutorial. Read More in no time. Let’s get to the tickets.
In addition to the formal numbering / Versioning solutions the software provides there is near infinite numbering / Versioning possibilities using metadata fields. Metadata fields are flexible, controllable and searchable to allow users to create numbering schemes they may require.  One possible use of metadata field numbering would be to store unique document numbers that might have been inherited from a legacy document management or even paper based filing system. By replicating these numbers in the document management software metadata fields, users can continue to search and find their documents based on the numbering scheme from a previous system.
Thank you for these clear instructions. I have had the same problem as Mommy Vaughan and followed the suggestion. However, on re-opening the Word document, I have the dialogue box Invalid Merge Field. I have to use Task Manager to close down Word. I am using Word 2010. Maybe that is part or all of the problem. Any ideas please? I need to sort this by tomorrow night to print them on Monday!
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