You need to create a list of numbers using some method (maybe even through VBA) as a text file, database or other data source, then just insert merge field in the document and use Print Merge to generate multiple labels with different numbers in it. (just need to give it enough space to fit the longest string along as many lines as you think there could be) If I reserve space for 50 chars and the major strings are 25 chars, the result is not professional looking. My solution for all print merge for ID cards (and similarities, incl. Auto numbering) is to merging data BEFORE printing, in an CDR file with all pages. So, I check all the cards and I correct only on text object how need. I found an software with this capabilities, but 300 USD is excesive (not only for Est Europe) for one only week of working (yes, his UI is better than my). I found an software with this capabilities, but 300 USD is excesive (not only for Est Europe) for one only week of working (yes, his UI is better than my) And my script use photo also.

In trying to produce 300 tickets, I can get all of the first numbered position to be sequential over 100 pages. But, when moving down to the second or third ticket position on the page and setting up the numbering, I repeatedly find that I get a repeat of the first 100 numbers. I am lost as to how to proceed. Is there any other missing step or info that I am assumed to have knowledge about that was not mentioned above? If you know of some other site that might explain this process any better, please post.
This video gives and example of raffle ticket printing using number pro with InDesign to create the numbering needed for 200 tickets. From creating the data file needed to laying out the document and finally the finished file ready for printing. Number-pro is an easy to use, stand alone application that can be used with InDesign, Corel Draw, Word, Publisher and any other desktop publishing or graphics software that

If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
This video gives and example of raffle ticket printing using number pro with InDesign to create the numbering needed for 200 tickets. From creating the data file needed to laying out the document and finally the finished file ready for printing. Number-pro is an easy to use, stand alone application that can be used with InDesign, Corel Draw, Word, Publisher and any other desktop publishing or graphics software that
It depends what the design is for the tickets. But if you set up primary text frames, linked for the area for the numbers, you can create a numbered list with the numbering format you want. Then, just pour in a whole load of paragraph returns that have that numbered list applied. And make sure each numbered paragraph is set to start in the next column.
It was the paper size and multiple pages that was stumping me. However I do have a tip for those wanting a short cut to raffle books of 10. It is a little more fidgety so Im sure someone who is experienced with excel (Im not) but it will make the cutting perfect. Print out in sheets of ten and you just need to staple, cut and perforate...then you have 4-5 ready made raffle books.

I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count.


Add specific codes to coupons to track customer responses     Use different codes for your different marketing messages, advertisements, or promotions. These codes will enable you to keep track of how customers learned about your offer. The more you learn about who is drawn to your business and what attracts customers' attention, the better you can focus future marketing efforts.
Numbered tickets are a bitch in InDesign. Mainly because if the RIP time. I've found that what I have to do is do two runs. One run of just the tickets with the blank area for the numbers. Then I put those back through the copier to print the numbers on them. You want to set up an excel sheet with just one set of your numbers. Not 1, 1, 2, 2. Just 1-3000. Then you create the text boxes for the numbers for the first ticket and draw a text box that is the exact size of the ticket around and send it to the background. Then do a mail merge. You will grab the mail merge name of the column and drop it into each text box so each text box will have the name of your column (like <>). That means that being the same, each number will go into each box so the first ticket will get number 1 and number 1. Then you do the mail merge doing multiple entries per page or whatever it's called and it will create all the pages needed. So you will end up with a 375 page document to create 3000 total tickets based on an 8 up.
Below, we have a small and easy to follow tutorial on how to create sequentially numbered raffle tickets using Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel. Simply choose one of our 30 raffle ticket templates and download it to your computer. Next, begin the following tutorial. This tutorial will take you through the process of using Excel to create the numbering sequence, which you will then save, and import into Microsoft Word.
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.
The task of producing numbered tickets in Microsoft Word might seem pretty tough and strenuous especially for those people who are not skilled and trained in using Word files. There are quite a lot of people who have been left disappointed, disheartened and exasperated by their failures in attempting to explore how to create tickets for an event using Word templates. Many unanswered queries, doubts and confusions might have stood in the path of your success.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.

Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.


In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
CS2 (or earlier) “Cheesy” Numbering There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice. To ensure each number fills its own text frame, select the whole story (Command/Ctrl-A), open the Keep Options (Command/Ctrl-Option/Alt-K) and choose In Next Frame from the Start Paragraph pop-up menu.
The event will set up certain prizes. Raffle tickets are then sold, and the people told to hold them until the raffle is held. Raffle tickets are then drawn randomly, and the holders of the winning tickets get a prize. While organizers can be as creative as they wish, offering bulk purchases of tickets and discounts, the basic rules stay the same. The benefit of holding raffles is that donors enjoy the anticipation of possibly winning a prize, while donating to a charity. This makes raffle tickets one of the most popular ways to earn for a nonprofit.
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It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.
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