The task of producing numbered tickets in Microsoft Word might seem pretty tough and strenuous especially for those people who are not skilled and trained in using Word files. There are quite a lot of people who have been left disappointed, disheartened and exasperated by their failures in attempting to explore how to create tickets for an event using Word templates. Many unanswered queries, doubts and confusions might have stood in the path of your success.
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
Drag your cursor on the Font toolbar on the top of the ms word document and formulate necessary alterations. If you are troubling to find ways to include images to make your ticket look appealing and rich, then you need not worry. Just put your cursor on the Insert option in the tool bar and hit on it to add appropriate images befitting the occasion.

I answer readers' questions about Microsoft Office when I can, but there's no guarantee. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise, nor do I ask for a fee from readers. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel. I then let InDesign CS4 do the merging. Here’s the formula.
I then numbered two rows across 1 -4, then 5 -8. Then I dropped down to A – H in row 260. (I did this to give 1,000+ numbered tickets.) I then used the Excel fill function chosing series and told the program to skip by 4. It filled the rows. I then saved as a tab delimited text file. In InDesign CS4, I set the tickets four up on the master page. On page 1, I positioned my merge fields such that ticket1 was directly above stub1, ticket 2 directly above stub 2, etc.

Am I the only individual here who is using CS3, and trying the method described, only to find that my version (5.0.2) for the mac doesn’t have the options anywhere that the author suggests? I have spent the past 2 hours trying to find the same screenshots the author has, only to become reall discouraged. Perhaps he is using a windows version that is setup differently? raffle ticket numbering using indesign
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