As far as threading the frames, is it that you don't understand threading? You accomplish that by using the selection tool to click in the outport box (the larger square near the lower right corner of the text frame), then clicking inside the frame you want to be next in the thread. Repeat as often as required, selecting the outport of the last frame you threaded each time. Text will now flow automatically from the first frame to the end of the thread. You can work backwards, too, if you wish, by selecting the inport (upper left) instead of the outport.
You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.
As far as threading the frames, is it that you don't understand threading? You accomplish that by using the selection tool to click in the outport box (the larger square near the lower right corner of the text frame), then clicking inside the frame you want to be next in the thread. Repeat as often as required, selecting the outport of the last frame you threaded each time. Text will now flow automatically from the first frame to the end of the thread. You can work backwards, too, if you wish, by selecting the inport (upper left) instead of the outport.
Open a new blank document in Word. Create two raffle ticket designs, one for the person who buys the ticket and one for the organization selling them. Make sure to connect the two tickets, for example by making them in two-cell tables, side-by-side. Include the name of the organization, perhaps the first prize, and any other information you want on the buyer’s ticket. You might, for example, include spaces for the buyer’s name (“Name__________”) and phone number on the organization’s ticket. On both tickets, enter a dummy number for the raffle ticket number as a placeholder.
It depends what the design is for the tickets. But if you set up primary text frames, linked for the area for the numbers, you can create a numbered list with the numbering format you want. Then, just pour in a whole load of paragraph returns that have that numbered list applied. And make sure each numbered paragraph is set to start in the next column.
We are providing up to 30 different raffle ticket template designs representing different events for you to download to your computer. These templates are professionally designed in Microsoft Word and can be used to create a series of ticket numbers on each ticket within Microsoft Word. We guarantee that by using our raffle ticket templates, you will be creating professional looking raffle tickets for your fund-raising events.
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).

With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.

Permalink Peter, I have done the "master" function successfully. It appears to work.I ran a form job to the press with a large quantity of numbers successfully. Thank you. A full color ticket job with only two hundred sheets did create a large file in my print que however, and feed very slowly. Can you tell me; Does Indesign still create an image for each sheet when printing? I am still a bit confused about the threading technique you mentioned. Would this create an easier feed to the printer or "smaller" file size?
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
My script looks for the object-name and replaces all the numbers at the end of the text-string. Example: TEST010111 start: 9 how long is the number-string? 5 > TEST00009,TEST00010 and so on every marked object with the specified objectname will get the new string. I have another script that places the marked object(s) in a user-sized sheet after editing the quantity X and Y and the space between the objects.
• On the document page, override the items by Command/Ctrl-Shift-dragging over them (or clicking on them). • Select that one page and duplicate it in the Pages panel, or by choosing Layout > Pages > Duplicate Spread. • Select the original page and the duplicate and then copy those. Repeat this (select pages and duplicate) until you have enough pages. Unfortunately, InDesign isn’t exactly speedy at updating these numbers when you add a bunch of pages.
It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.

If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
×