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As far as threading the frames, is it that you don't understand threading? You accomplish that by using the selection tool to click in the outport box (the larger square near the lower right corner of the text frame), then clicking inside the frame you want to be next in the thread. Repeat as often as required, selecting the outport of the last frame you threaded each time. Text will now flow automatically from the first frame to the end of the thread. You can work backwards, too, if you wish, by selecting the inport (upper left) instead of the outport.
Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.

The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
Hi - are you creating your own tickets using the instructions on this page? If so, you can of course change the font and everything else in your Word document. If you are using the Raffle Ticket Creator app (app.raffleticketcreator.com) then you can't change the font size ... you'll just need to tinker with the exact words that you are including in order to get them to fit on the page. Hope that helps!
The event will set up certain prizes. Raffle tickets are then sold, and the people told to hold them until the raffle is held. Raffle tickets are then drawn randomly, and the holders of the winning tickets get a prize. While organizers can be as creative as they wish, offering bulk purchases of tickets and discounts, the basic rules stay the same. The benefit of holding raffles is that donors enjoy the anticipation of possibly winning a prize, while donating to a charity. This makes raffle tickets one of the most popular ways to earn for a nonprofit.
You’re selling raffle tickets to make money, so why buy the tickets pre-printed? Using Microsoft Word’s mail merge function, you can create your own raffle tickets and design them any way you please. A mail merge doesn’t have to make mail; it is simply a way to define certainly elements of a document, then automatically insert variable elements, such as raffle ticket numbers. The most important thing to remember is that each ticket needs a mate–you don’t want to pull winning ticket number 81018 only to find that no one bought that one.

Number Pro does not create your raffle ticket or document it just allows an easy way to  number them. Check out Number Pro, take a look at the demo videos and even try the demo of Number Pro to see how it works. Number Pro is a cloud based application meaning there is no download of the application. We access the application online in the members area. They offer a three year membership with unlimited use.
This takes a little figuring out. I spent about 3 hours before I got it right, because I can be a little dense about things sometimes, but if you are going to do set numbers of tickets a few times, the time you spend arranging the numbers is well spent and will be made up on the cutter and in the sorting. It seems to me that you could do the same thing for use with the variable data module on the BizHub. I suspect the issue is that you have consecutive numbers on the same sheet so someone has to sort them all and stack them in order after they're printed and cut.
I often use Indesigns data merge to variable data number raffle tickets in Indesign. When I do the data merge it apparently creates multiple pages with my numbers in place. It works adequately for "small" runs, however on larger quantities it crashes prior to sending all the pages. I am sure that Indesign is applying the "art" to each page, creating a HUGE file. I apparently do not know how to create a "master" properly so that the art is applied (only once)and the number set is simply imposed to it with each page. I have read the help section but am still confused. Can anyone spell this out for me in "simple english?
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).

Hi - are you creating your own tickets using the instructions on this page? If so, you can of course change the font and everything else in your Word document. If you are using the Raffle Ticket Creator app (app.raffleticketcreator.com) then you can't change the font size ... you'll just need to tinker with the exact words that you are including in order to get them to fit on the page. Hope that helps!
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