Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing. The script that Mike referred to worked very well with CS2 and was fairly easy to extend to doing counterfoil numbers as well, but doesn’t seem to work with CS3. I have thrown together a small online script to generate the contents of a data source file to do ticket numbering through the normal CS3 InDesign data merge routine.
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer. :-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Am I the only individual here who is using CS3, and trying the method described, only to find that my version (5.0.2) for the mac doesn’t have the options anywhere that the author suggests? I have spent the past 2 hours trying to find the same screenshots the author has, only to become reall discouraged. Perhaps he is using a windows version that is setup differently?
I answer readers' questions about Microsoft Office when I can, but there's no guarantee. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise, nor do I ask for a fee from readers. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.
Given that Word can support 2,147,483,647 SEQ fields, the whole job could be done in a single document containing 30,000 tickets. On my system, creating such a document took only a few minutes and, once created took about two minutes to update the fields - and that was with about 40,000 pairs of SEQ fields coded as {SEQ Ticket \# 00000} and {SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}. This number formatting is enough to go to 99,999 tickets.

Before you complete the merge, preview the merge results to make sure that the tracking numbers will display as you want them to in your publications. You can preview the merge in two ways: While you are refining the layout to review the layout of the individual coupon or gift certificate, or when you are getting ready to print, to preview the arrangement of coupons or gift certificates on the printed sheet. raffle ticket numbering
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