But it’s not hard to duplicate and reduplicate until you have a thousand or more numbered tickets. I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count. I handle this much differently. I create a number list in Excel and save as a txt file.
I am creating a file in inDesign for a client that is asking for numbered tickets. They'd like to be able to print a specific number for each ticket. I've read some of the older answers for similar questions that refer to Data Merge, but I'd prefer not to take that route if avoidable. What I'd ultimately like to do is create a space for the numbers to go, select the number of pages within the Print menu, and have the spaces populate with the corresponding numbers while printing.
Getting Word to put a unique number on each raffle ticket is easy enough, but persuading Word to print out several uniquely-numbered raffle tickets per sheet of paper is very hard (I think it is impossible, actually. At least I couldn't figure it out. UPDATE: I did figure it out. Instructions for printing raffle tickets using Microsoft Word are here.). And you don't really want to have every raffle ticket use up a whole sheet of paper.

There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document.
CS2 (or earlier) “Cheesy” Numbering There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice. To ensure each number fills its own text frame, select the whole story (Command/Ctrl-A), open the Keep Options (Command/Ctrl-Option/Alt-K) and choose In Next Frame from the Start Paragraph pop-up menu.
I am creating a file in inDesign for a client that is asking for numbered tickets. They'd like to be able to print a specific number for each ticket. I've read some of the older answers for similar questions that refer to Data Merge, but I'd prefer not to take that route if avoidable. What I'd ultimately like to do is create a space for the numbers to go, select the number of pages within the Print menu, and have the spaces populate with the corresponding numbers while printing.

You’re selling raffle tickets to make money, so why buy the tickets pre-printed? Using Microsoft Word’s mail merge function, you can create your own raffle tickets and design them any way you please. A mail merge doesn’t have to make mail; it is simply a way to define certainly elements of a document, then automatically insert variable elements, such as raffle ticket numbers. The most important thing to remember is that each ticket needs a mate–you don’t want to pull winning ticket number 81018 only to find that no one bought that one.
Number Pro does not create your raffle ticket or document it just allows an easy way to  number them. Check out Number Pro, take a look at the demo videos and even try the demo of Number Pro to see how it works. Number Pro is a cloud based application meaning there is no download of the application. We access the application online in the members area. They offer a three year membership with unlimited use.
Create a master frame in ID to hold the number and if I have more than one ticket on a page just link the frames. Apply a paragraph style that starts in a new frame for the numbers. Place the text file with a shift click and the numbers are formatted and the new pages are autoflowed. The number list is very easy to create in Excel with the auto fill feature for that type of thing.
I had wanted to create a file that didn't require Excel as the data source, so I created one using SEQ fields. It was terrible and too huge to mention (thanks Doug Robbins), so I recreated it using Word as the data source so that people who only have Word can use it. You can create up to 5,000 tickets without changing the data file. If you only have Word and need to create more than 5,000 tickets, please don't type the ticket numbers. Just drop me an email and I'll create another data file for you with the required numbers.

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The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
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Chuck, It does look as though using data merge is the best way, but rather than generating the numbers in Excel here is an improved number generator script to create indesign number and counterfoil numbering data merge files. We recently had to print 500 numbered tickets 8 up on 8.5 x 11. When we took it back to Bindery they would have had to hand collate the tickets back in order after the cut.
The ticket numbering problem seems solved, if awkwardly. But what about linking automatic numbering of text references to a figure (e.g. “see fig.101″) to a legend of that figure (e.g. Fig. 101 shows….”)? Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author!

The uncomplicated , straight forward and trouble free method for creating numbered tickets (movie ticket template) is to search for existing templates which can be modified and attuned to suit your requirements. Today umpteen numbers of Microsoft word files which provide a wide variety of ticket designs are available throughout the net space. You can either make use of them as they are or you are free to make them unique by making your own alterations. You can insert images or texts that you desire and make them your own!
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.

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Just download the Raffle tickets with consecutive numbering and matching stubs from the Microsoft Office website. It is a 2003 version and I have Office 2010.   The template has sequential numbering and displays 8 tickets on 2 pages, but I need 3000 tickets.  How do I add more tickets to this document.  I have looked online for tutorials, but most are for starting a ticket from scratch.  Please help!!
I basically used Bob Levine’s method (thanks) but wanted to add some extra detail – am using CS2 which is somewhat behind CS3 in this area. David, I was very discouraged to read your response to Josh on April 28th 2008. It seems your comment was quite dismissive to him with exactly no feedback help. He seemed to be looking for some more help trying to work through what you and the other InDesign gurus discuss as a “simple process”. I to, have read through your directions while using both mac & pc platforms. I fail to find the “standard features” screen shots that you show above in either program. I too have spent several hours trying to get the sequential 3-up numbering as described.

Given that Word can support 2,147,483,647 SEQ fields, the whole job could be done in a single document containing 30,000 tickets. On my system, creating such a document took only a few minutes and, once created took about two minutes to update the fields - and that was with about 40,000 pairs of SEQ fields coded as {SEQ Ticket \# 00000} and {SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}. This number formatting is enough to go to 99,999 tickets.
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.
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