Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.
Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.
I would like to number a voucher book, i have place 4 vouchers on a page, the thing is that i want each of these vouchers to start with different number, 100, 200, 300, 400, and then i want to number them 99 times. The problem is that they have to be numbered only 1 per page, so that when i have printed them all i can easily crop them and staple them right up with having to go through it all.

In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.

I would like to number a voucher book, i have place 4 vouchers on a page, the thing is that i want each of these vouchers to start with different number, 100, 200, 300, 400, and then i want to number them 99 times. The problem is that they have to be numbered only 1 per page, so that when i have printed them all i can easily crop them and staple them right up with having to go through it all.
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Whats happening is that the first set of NUMBERING (including sub numbering) i.e for 1.0 HEADING 1 is coming PERFECTLY as numbered. I hit "enter" at any level of numbering, word automatically puts the next number below that number. However for the rest of the headings such as 2.0 and 3.0, where there should be 2.1 there is 1.1, where there should be 2.2, its 1.2 and so on and so forth. Same for 3.0 and its numbering subsets.
Roger Wambolt, senior product trainer at Corel, eases in with an exploration of the interface and touches on the major players in the toolbox: the Pick, Shape, Crop, Curve, and Interactive tools. Then, once you know how to draw simple lines and shapes, he shows how to group, copy, and adjust objects on your document page. Plus, learn about working with text, using the new Font Manager and the extensive library of fonts in CorelDRAW, adding and editing images, automating tasks with scripts and macros, creating color palettes, and preparing your CorelDRAW projects for print. Roger closes with some tips on customizing the CorelDRAW interface to be more productive and create your designs in fewer steps.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.

Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.

By default, bullets and numbers inherit some of their text formatting from the first character in the paragraph to which they’re attached. If the first character in one paragraph is different from the first characters in other paragraphs, the numbering or bullet character may appear inconsistent with the other list items. If this is not the formatting you desire, create a character style for numbers or bullets and apply it to your list by using the Bullets And Numbering dialog box.
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.
You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.
Thanks Javad. That sounds like a very interesting document! So, one part has the binding on the left like normal, and one part has the binding on the right, is this correct? It is possible to re-start the numbering of the page numbers, however the binding swapping might be a more interesting challenge. I would take the easy way out and just create two separate documents, then combine them afterwards!
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.
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