This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
Many Office programs will detect when you start a numbered or bulleted list and helpfully automate it, so that when you press Enter, new list items are automatically indented and bulleted or numbered. If this behavior isn’t actually all that helpful for you, and you’d rather control your own list-making without Office’s help, you can turn to your autocorrect options.
UPDATE: I was able to fix this by DEselecting “Allow Document Pages to Shuffle” and “Allow Spreads to Shuffle.” Or perhaps I only need to do one of those, but I was trying everything in the book and happen to uncheck those. Once I deselected those, I was able to move the spreads back to the way they needed to be. Of course, I had to do each of them individually, which would be tedious if you had a very large document already created. Definitely something that I will have to remember to do at the beginning of creating a document. (Luckily, this particular one is only six pages.) I’m wondering if there is a quicker way if this issue returned.
All of this happens in the Bullets & Numbering dialog box, shown below. You will definitely want to use paragraph styles for this. My first one is called Chapter title. You will need to begin by changing the List Type to Numbers for all of the levels, and you must both name the List and use the same named list for all Levels. You do this by selecting the List > New List.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
This is ideal if use certain tools with the same settings every time. SignTools Quick Palette Complete list of tools Shades & Decorations - SignTools 4 contains 13 quick and easy to use shades and decorations. Included are Outline, Relief Outline, Outline & Shade, Relief Outline & Shade, Drop Shade, Relief Drop Shade, Relief Effect, Inline, Cast Shade, Relief Cast Shade, Highlight, Emboss and Highlight & Sink.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
You can define a section prefix to label section pages automatically. For example, if you specify A– for Section Prefix on page 16 of a document and include the section prefix, the page will appear in the table of contents or index as A–16. Text you type for a section marker appears when you choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Section Marker.
Now, modify the Paragraph settings of every Heading style so that the Left Indent is 0, and the Special indent is set to (none). Do this even if you want your headings to be indented from the left margin, and even if you want a hanging indent. Why? Because for outline-numbered styles, we will set the paragraph indent and the hanging indents (if any) when we set up the numbering.
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.
You can exclude the first page(s) from numbering. This may be needed if page 1 follows after pages that have no numbers, or have individual numbering as the table of contents in large books. To show number 1 on page 2, double-click on its page number field and set First page to 2. Note that to have the correct page numbers on the following pages, you need either place the page number field on a master page, or set the same First page value on all pages.

In Japanese, Chinese, or Korean versions, by default, Arabic numerals are used for page numbers. However, if you use the Numbering & Section Options command, you can specify the style of numbering, such as Roman numerals, Arabic numerals, Kanji, and so on. The Style option allows you to select the number of digits in the page number, for example, 001 or 0001. Each part of the document that uses a different numbering style is called a section. For more information on sections, see Define section numbering.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
You can insert page numbers on the current page, all pages, all odd pages, or all even pages. When you insert page numbers on multiple pages, a new master layer is automatically created, and the page number is placed on it. The master layer can be an all-page master layer, an odd-page master layer, or an even-page master layer. For more information about master layers, see Creating layers.

Do not let me lead you into a headache under false pretences: this FAQ is not going to tell you how to fix a document that contains broken numbering. It simply explains how the numbering works: this is valuable information if you work with Word a lot, and by understanding it, you can often work out how to fix a document. However, this FAQ is not going to tell you how.  (For a discussion of methods, see: List Restart Methods).


I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.


Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages. numbering in indesign
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