Whats happening is that the first set of NUMBERING (including sub numbering) i.e for 1.0 HEADING 1 is coming PERFECTLY as numbered. I hit "enter" at any level of numbering, word automatically puts the next number below that number. However for the rest of the headings such as 2.0 and 3.0, where there should be 2.1 there is 1.1, where there should be 2.2, its 1.2 and so on and so forth. Same for 3.0 and its numbering subsets.
It works from within Corel Draw and eliminates the need to export graphics and then import them into sign making software. In fact SignTools 4 turns Corel Draw into arguably the best sign program currently available. SignTools 4 is a floating application that works from within Corel Draw 10, 11, 12, X3, X4, X5, X6, X7*,X8 and 2017. It can be moved to any part of the screen and also contains a customizable Quick Palette, allowing users to setup the program with their most used tools. The Quick Palette makes using the tools faster than ever before. You can even click on the 'Auto' option allowing you to use tools with a single click.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
Thanks Javad. That sounds like a very interesting document! So, one part has the binding on the left like normal, and one part has the binding on the right, is this correct? It is possible to re-start the numbering of the page numbers, however the binding swapping might be a more interesting challenge. I would take the easy way out and just create two separate documents, then combine them afterwards!
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.

Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers
Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.

So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)

If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.

Place the insertion point in the paragraph and choose Restart Numbering from the context menu or choose Type > Bulleted And Numbered Lists > Restart Numbering. In normal lists, this command assigns the number 1 (or letter A) to a paragraph and makes it the first paragraph in a list. In multi-level lists, this command assigns the first lower-level number to a nested paragraph.
To save the list style to a template so you can use it with other documents, select the list in the document. Access the Multilevel List dropdown and choose Define New List Style. Enter a descriptive new and select the New documents based on this template (at the bottom). Once you click OK, the multilevel list style will be available in all new documents.
I would like to number a voucher book, i have place 4 vouchers on a page, the thing is that i want each of these vouchers to start with different number, 100, 200, 300, 400, and then i want to number them 99 times. The problem is that they have to be numbered only 1 per page, so that when i have printed them all i can easily crop them and staple them right up with having to go through it all.
You can control whether your next paragraph number continues the current sequence or starts again at 1 within that same right-click menu. If one of your numbers gets out of sequence, simply right-click and choose Continue Numbering. If you want to force the number back to the beginning (say, you’re switching from interrogatories to requests for production), choose Set Numbering Value (which will also give you the option of continuing the previous list).
Two things to keep in mind regarding numbering across multiple frames: First, you have to set up a List, as discussed in this post. Second, fi you have more than one unthreaded text frame on the same page, the numbering can get wonky because the numbering is based on the order you created the text frames. Cut and paste a frame and the number updates.
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package
I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.

Numbering in Word is a bit of a nightmare at times and if you need multi-level numbering this could cause you much stress if you rely on the mouse alone. Using the keyboard to some degree makes this task very simple. I will explain how to create a multi-levelled numbered list and ask you to keep all the default formatting that Word gives you. This can be changed and modified but sometimes it messes up your layout. I advise to use what is there until you have the times and patience to master its intricacies.
UPDATE: I was able to fix this by DEselecting “Allow Document Pages to Shuffle” and “Allow Spreads to Shuffle.” Or perhaps I only need to do one of those, but I was trying everything in the book and happen to uncheck those. Once I deselected those, I was able to move the spreads back to the way they needed to be. Of course, I had to do each of them individually, which would be tedious if you had a very large document already created. Definitely something that I will have to remember to do at the beginning of creating a document. (Luckily, this particular one is only six pages.) I’m wondering if there is a quicker way if this issue returned.

We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)


12. To build the document, you will add the first merge field, the room number. To do this, choose Room from the Field list box, and click Insert Print Merge Field. This will place the variable on the document. Next, choose Subjectfrom the Field list box, and click Insert Print Merge Fieldonce more. Now both variables are inserted in the CorelDRAW document.
Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.
This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.

There may be instances in your Adobe InDesign documents that you want to change the start page, by default the numbering starts at page one on the first page of your document but if you right click on for example page 2 you can select ‘Numbering and section options’ then you can click the button ‘Start page numbering at’ then type ‘2’ in to the box. this will snow start a new section on page two which will make page 2’s page number actually page 1. You can start new page numbering sections anywhere in your Adobe InDesign document. 
One of the last things we need to do is our Table of Contents. We did this earlier, where we had different page numbering. So, all we need to do now is, because we've redefined all our Styles, and we're doing it all proper now, if we go to 'Layout'-- I've got my cursor flashing in here, first of all go to 'Layout', let's go to 'Update Table of Contents', and I'm going to click 'OK'. There's some spaces left in the front of this when I was messing around with it before, yours should be fine. So it's updated to the correct numbers. One thing I also did was I went in and adjusted the font from Medium to Light because I just liked it. I did that in between tutorials.
Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
Two things to keep in mind regarding numbering across multiple frames: First, you have to set up a List, as discussed in this post. Second, fi you have more than one unthreaded text frame on the same page, the numbering can get wonky because the numbering is based on the order you created the text frames. Cut and paste a frame and the number updates.
You can exclude the first page(s) from numbering. This may be needed if page 1 follows after pages that have no numbers, or have individual numbering as the table of contents in large books. To show number 1 on page 2, double-click on its page number field and set First page to 2. Note that to have the correct page numbers on the following pages, you need either place the page number field on a master page, or set the same First page value on all pages.
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