Almost everything I learned about Word's numbering I learned from the Word newsgroups (especially the Microsoft Word Numbering newsgroup) and from the MS Word MVP FAQ site. The contributions of John McGhie (especially his article about Word's Numbering Explained on the MS Word MVP FAQ site) and Dave Rado are significant. The current page represents a mere summary and application of some of that work.
Do not let me lead you into a headache under false pretences: this FAQ is not going to tell you how to fix a document that contains broken numbering. It simply explains how the numbering works: this is valuable information if you work with Word a lot, and by understanding it, you can often work out how to fix a document. However, this FAQ is not going to tell you how.  (For a discussion of methods, see: List Restart Methods).
In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
UPDATE: I was able to fix this by DEselecting “Allow Document Pages to Shuffle” and “Allow Spreads to Shuffle.” Or perhaps I only need to do one of those, but I was trying everything in the book and happen to uncheck those. Once I deselected those, I was able to move the spreads back to the way they needed to be. Of course, I had to do each of them individually, which would be tedious if you had a very large document already created. Definitely something that I will have to remember to do at the beginning of creating a document. (Luckily, this particular one is only six pages.) I’m wondering if there is a quicker way if this issue returned.
Hi Enas, it sounds like the issue you are experiencing is about the PDF Export process. Have a look at this thread on the Adobe Community support forum:http://forums.adobe.com/thread/615575 It seems to suggest that corrupt image files can cause problems like this. You also might want to check that you enough space on the disk you’re exporting the PDF too – if it runs out of room then you would get errors. Sorry I can’t help much more than give you some general ideas. Best of luck resolving the issue. Cheers Philippa
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
The software Classic Menu for Office is designed for the people who are accustomed to the old interface of Microsoft Office 2003, XP (2002) and 2000. It brings back the classic menus and toolbars to Microsoft Office (includes Word) 2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016. The classic view helps the people to smoothly upgrade to the latest version of Office, and work with Office 2007/2010/2013/2016 as if it were Office 2003 (and 2002, 2000).
You can exclude the first page(s) from numbering. This may be needed if page 1 follows after pages that have no numbers, or have individual numbering as the table of contents in large books. To show number 1 on page 2, double-click on its page number field and set First page to 2. Note that to have the correct page numbers on the following pages, you need either place the page number field on a master page, or set the same First page value on all pages.
You will occasionally want to place an unnumbered paragraph in the middle of a sequence, but the moment you hit Enter, another paragraph number pops up. To fix this, toggle paragraph numbering off by pressing the paragraph numbering button you used for the previous paragraph. (If you use the button’s drop-down, choose None as the numbering scheme.) Unfortunately, the paragraph settings won’t revert to Normal here; it’ll usually have the paragraph indented 0.25. Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+Q to strip paragraph settings out, then revise the formatting as you wish.
The creator of ShaunaKelly.com, Shauna Kelly, passed away peacefully on Wednesday November 16, 2011 after a long battle with ovarian cancer. If you are requesting permission to re-use any information on this site, then you may do so with appropriate acknowledgement of her work. If her words, thoughts or pictures have helped you, or made money for you, then please consider making a donation in her name to the Women's Cancer Foundation.
If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.
You can control whether your next paragraph number continues the current sequence or starts again at 1 within that same right-click menu. If one of your numbers gets out of sequence, simply right-click and choose Continue Numbering. If you want to force the number back to the beginning (say, you’re switching from interrogatories to requests for production), choose Set Numbering Value (which will also give you the option of continuing the previous list).
If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.
A List Style stores the information about how to number each level. That includes the format of the number ( "1" or "a" or "i"), whether the number is preceded by text (eg "Chapter 1" or "Part A"), whether the number includes previous levels' numbers (eg paragraph 1.4.3), and the indents (the distance from margin to number and from number to text).
The creator of ShaunaKelly.com, Shauna Kelly, passed away peacefully on Wednesday November 16, 2011 after a long battle with ovarian cancer. If you are requesting permission to re-use any information on this site, then you may do so with appropriate acknowledgement of her work. If her words, thoughts or pictures have helped you, or made money for you, then please consider making a donation in her name to the Women's Cancer Foundation.

In the Adobe InDesign document I’m working on here we actually have two master pages, an ‘A’ master and a ‘B’ master so I’m going to select both the left and right hand page frames with the special character in on my ‘A’ master and go to Edit>Copy. I’m then going to double click on my ‘B’ master page and go to Edit>Paste in place. this will then copy the special character and position it in exactly the same place as it appears on my ‘A’ master. numbering in publisher

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