Whats happening is that the first set of NUMBERING (including sub numbering) i.e for 1.0 HEADING 1 is coming PERFECTLY as numbered. I hit "enter" at any level of numbering, word automatically puts the next number below that number. However for the rest of the headings such as 2.0 and 3.0, where there should be 2.1 there is 1.1, where there should be 2.2, its 1.2 and so on and so forth. Same for 3.0 and its numbering subsets.

Many Office programs will detect when you start a numbered or bulleted list and helpfully automate it, so that when you press Enter, new list items are automatically indented and bulleted or numbered. If this behavior isn’t actually all that helpful for you, and you’d rather control your own list-making without Office’s help, you can turn to your autocorrect options.
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.
Two things to keep in mind regarding numbering across multiple frames: First, you have to set up a List, as discussed in this post. Second, fi you have more than one unthreaded text frame on the same page, the numbering can get wonky because the numbering is based on the order you created the text frames. Cut and paste a frame and the number updates.
This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.
Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.
This is ideal if use certain tools with the same settings every time. SignTools Quick Palette Complete list of tools Shades & Decorations - SignTools 4 contains 13 quick and easy to use shades and decorations. Included are Outline, Relief Outline, Outline & Shade, Relief Outline & Shade, Drop Shade, Relief Drop Shade, Relief Effect, Inline, Cast Shade, Relief Cast Shade, Highlight, Emboss and Highlight & Sink.
The software Classic Menu for Office is designed for the people who are accustomed to the old interface of Microsoft Office 2003, XP (2002) and 2000. It brings back the classic menus and toolbars to Microsoft Office (includes Word) 2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016. The classic view helps the people to smoothly upgrade to the latest version of Office, and work with Office 2007/2010/2013/2016 as if it were Office 2003 (and 2002, 2000).
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
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