In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.
UPDATE: I was able to fix this by DEselecting “Allow Document Pages to Shuffle” and “Allow Spreads to Shuffle.” Or perhaps I only need to do one of those, but I was trying everything in the book and happen to uncheck those. Once I deselected those, I was able to move the spreads back to the way they needed to be. Of course, I had to do each of them individually, which would be tedious if you had a very large document already created. Definitely something that I will have to remember to do at the beginning of creating a document. (Luckily, this particular one is only six pages.) I’m wondering if there is a quicker way if this issue returned.
I want to point out that if this document is a fixed set of standards but will be amended in later editions, then autonumbers will increment, which is a bad idea. In legal documents, numbers are usually static, and deletions are struck-through, not deleted, to preserve the original numbering, so that older and newer editions can be compared number-by-number. Inserted and appended content would need to be manually numbered. You may want to create the first edition with autonumbering, then convert the numbered list numbers to text, to avoid unwanted renumbering in future editions.
There are lots of options. For instance, you might reduce the amount of space between the number and the text by changing the Text indent at setting. Or, you might center the heading by choosing Center from the Number alignment dropdown. For even more options, click More to expose several more settings. You could use the Apply changes to option when setting level 1 to the I, II, III numbering style instead of changing it for each level.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
A List Style stores the information about how to number each level. That includes the format of the number ( "1" or "a" or "i"), whether the number is preceded by text (eg "Chapter 1" or "Part A"), whether the number includes previous levels' numbers (eg paragraph 1.4.3), and the indents (the distance from margin to number and from number to text).
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
Thanks for asking, but if you haven't done the Google search I suggested in post 1 of this thread and practiced with any of the tutorials at the linked resources there, or those recommended in posts 2 and 6, please do. Perhaps someone on the list will do the work you're requesting. As a trainer I feel my best value is to offer paths to solutions so folks can learn to use the tools. Some tools require more practice, but those are the ones that give the most pleasure of discovery at the "Aha!" moment that comes when one "gets it."
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
It sure is possible! Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. Insert a Current Page Number marker (Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number) in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended), select the first page of your section, open the Numbering and Section Options dialog, and enter 200 in the Start Page Numbering at: field. Hope this helps!
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
One of the last things we need to do is our Table of Contents. We did this earlier, where we had different page numbering. So, all we need to do now is, because we've redefined all our Styles, and we're doing it all proper now, if we go to 'Layout'-- I've got my cursor flashing in here, first of all go to 'Layout', let's go to 'Update Table of Contents', and I'm going to click 'OK'. There's some spaces left in the front of this when I was messing around with it before, yours should be fine. So it's updated to the correct numbers. One thing I also did was I went in and adjusted the font from Medium to Light because I just liked it. I did that in between tutorials.
If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.

Roger Wambolt, senior product trainer at Corel, eases in with an exploration of the interface and touches on the major players in the toolbox: the Pick, Shape, Crop, Curve, and Interactive tools. Then, once you know how to draw simple lines and shapes, he shows how to group, copy, and adjust objects on your document page. Plus, learn about working with text, using the new Font Manager and the extensive library of fonts in CorelDRAW, adding and editing images, automating tasks with scripts and macros, creating color palettes, and preparing your CorelDRAW projects for print. Roger closes with some tips on customizing the CorelDRAW interface to be more productive and create your designs in fewer steps.
And what all did I forget to do? I forgot to go to 'Styles', 'Paragraph Styles', and I went, right click 'Redefine' because I've reverted to what it was before. So that's page numbering, we used A, B, C, D at the beginning. And we're going to use 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 for the rest of it. The only trouble happens, is when you go 'File', 'Print' now, and you're like, "Hmm." "I want to print pages." and you're not too sure. So what I have to do is go to A, through to 30. So it will include A, B, C, D, E, and all the way through the numbers. What if I just need A, B, or if I just print 1-30? It's going to skip out these first pages. That's just something to be aware of when you're printing, or making PDFs, that the page numbering is a little bit stranger now that we've gone and messed around with the page numbering.
To modify the options, click the Multilevel List option (in the Paragraph Group). Word selects all lists currently in use in the List Library. You'll see two options below the gallery: Define New Multilevel List and Define New List Style. Use the first to create and save a stable custom list style. You'll use the second to change list styles. You can also use the latter to create a new style. So, what's the difference? The Define New List Style option lets you name a style, so you can share, modify, and delete it later. Most users will never need this option. Now, let's move on: choose Define New Multilevel List. Figure D shows the resulting dialog.
With the numbered paragraphs shown above, there is no extra spacing between the paragraphs. That’s easy to fix. Go ahead and type out at least part of your first numbered paragraph, then go to the Page Layout tab and adjust the value of Spacing After in the Paragraph section. Still no extra space? There’s one more setting to check. Click the launcher arrow in the lower right-hand corner to go to the Paragraph dialog box, uncheck the box next to “Don’t add space between paragraphs of the same style.” Click OK. That paragraph and all the remaining numbered ones will have more breathing room.
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
The creator of ShaunaKelly.com, Shauna Kelly, passed away peacefully on Wednesday November 16, 2011 after a long battle with ovarian cancer. If you are requesting permission to re-use any information on this site, then you may do so with appropriate acknowledgement of her work. If her words, thoughts or pictures have helped you, or made money for you, then please consider making a donation in her name to the Women's Cancer Foundation.
In a legal document, it's rare for every paragraph in the document to be numbered. Usually, you change between numbered paragraphs and non-numbered (plain) paragraphs of text. When Word sees you switching between these types of formats, it usually tries to help by restarting your numbered list back at "1" (or the first value of your list, such as "A"). There are a few different ways to make the number follow the last number of your paragraphs. In Word, this is called Continue from Previous List.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

Numbering in Word is a bit of a nightmare at times and if you need multi-level numbering this could cause you much stress if you rely on the mouse alone. Using the keyboard to some degree makes this task very simple. I will explain how to create a multi-levelled numbered list and ask you to keep all the default formatting that Word gives you. This can be changed and modified but sometimes it messes up your layout. I advise to use what is there until you have the times and patience to master its intricacies.


If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.

In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
UPDATE: I was able to fix this by DEselecting “Allow Document Pages to Shuffle” and “Allow Spreads to Shuffle.” Or perhaps I only need to do one of those, but I was trying everything in the book and happen to uncheck those. Once I deselected those, I was able to move the spreads back to the way they needed to be. Of course, I had to do each of them individually, which would be tedious if you had a very large document already created. Definitely something that I will have to remember to do at the beginning of creating a document. (Luckily, this particular one is only six pages.) I’m wondering if there is a quicker way if this issue returned.
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
UPDATE: I was able to fix this by DEselecting “Allow Document Pages to Shuffle” and “Allow Spreads to Shuffle.” Or perhaps I only need to do one of those, but I was trying everything in the book and happen to uncheck those. Once I deselected those, I was able to move the spreads back to the way they needed to be. Of course, I had to do each of them individually, which would be tedious if you had a very large document already created. Definitely something that I will have to remember to do at the beginning of creating a document. (Luckily, this particular one is only six pages.) I’m wondering if there is a quicker way if this issue returned.
In Japanese, Chinese, or Korean versions, by default, Arabic numerals are used for page numbers. However, if you use the Numbering & Section Options command, you can specify the style of numbering, such as Roman numerals, Arabic numerals, Kanji, and so on. The Style option allows you to select the number of digits in the page number, for example, 001 or 0001. Each part of the document that uses a different numbering style is called a section. For more information on sections, see Define section numbering.
Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.
Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.
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