There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.


Hopefully what this InDesign tutorial will show you is that page numbering in InDesign is just as easy to do as it is any other program, and much easier than in most. InDesign allows for quick, easy, and automatic page numbering, and I’ll be showing you how to do that today. It’s a simple trick to learn, takes only a few short seconds, and will be a skill that you will be thankful for every time you need to use it. You can always refer back to this InDesign tutorial should you forget any of the steps.
Running captions number figures, tables, and other items consecutively in a document. For example, the first figure caption starts with the words “Figure 1,” the second with “Figure 2,” and so on. To make sure that figures, tables, or similar items are numbered consecutively, define a list for the item, and then create a paragraph style that includes the list definition. You can also add descriptive words such as “Figure” or “Table” to the numbering scheme of the paragraph style. numbering using publisher
Thanks Javad. That sounds like a very interesting document! So, one part has the binding on the left like normal, and one part has the binding on the right, is this correct? It is possible to re-start the numbering of the page numbers, however the binding swapping might be a more interesting challenge. I would take the easy way out and just create two separate documents, then combine them afterwards!
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.

Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number. numbering using indesign
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