If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.
Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers

Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.

I wonder if I’m now up against a limitation of the feature: I have chapter numbers which are large and separated from the main text flow — each in its own text frame on the outer margin. These should be level 1 (‘X’) of the numbering system. Then the next heading (which is in the main body text flow) is level 2 (‘X.x’), and the next level 3 (‘X.x.x’). Unfortunately the level 2 headings do not follow from the level 1 numbering and I wonder if it’s because I’m using separate, non-linked frames for level 1? (The list does have ‘Continue Numbers across Stories’ checked.)


One of the harder things to do in Adobe InDesign, surprisingly for a page layout tool, is to create multilevel or outline format numbered lists.  The right way to accomplish this, according to the folks at Adobe, is to create a Style for every level of the list you’d like to have! Here are Adobe’s instructions on how to do so (This content is taken directly from https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/bullets-numbering.html#create_multi_level_lists):
A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.
Now, I need to number the paragraphs in this section without them being headings, and link the number to the above Heading 2., i.e. 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3..... or even 2.1.a, 2.1.b. ….. in order that I have the possibility to cross-reference them somewhere in the document. Obviously this section cannot have a Heading 3 in the event of using 2.1.1 etc, otherwise the numbering gets confused.
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.

If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
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