Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.
After years in the graphic design and art industry, there’s one thing that I can’t understand: why designers try to get along without Adobe InDesign. I’ve been using this program for many years, and it’s helped me work efficiently and productively. I’ve created this website to show everyone that InDesign is a program that you can and should learn, and the best program for layout and desktop publishing. If you’re interested, check out my book on creating an ePub with InDesign. It’s got all you need to know in order to take your eBook from the final draft to an interesting and well-formatted ePub book.
In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.

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Hi Enas, it sounds like the issue you are experiencing is about the PDF Export process. Have a look at this thread on the Adobe Community support forum:http://forums.adobe.com/thread/615575 It seems to suggest that corrupt image files can cause problems like this. You also might want to check that you enough space on the disk you’re exporting the PDF too – if it runs out of room then you would get errors. Sorry I can’t help much more than give you some general ideas. Best of luck resolving the issue. Cheers Philippa
Each section within an InDesign document can be numbered differently. This allows you to use one type of numerals to consecutively number a document's preface or other introductory materials and another numeral system for the remainder of the document. You must first define your document's sections, and then you can add section markers or page markers to your master pages. Apply the master page to document pages to include the section and page numbers on the document pages.

In Japanese, Chinese, or Korean versions, by default, Arabic numerals are used for page numbers. However, if you use the Numbering & Section Options command, you can specify the style of numbering, such as Roman numerals, Arabic numerals, Kanji, and so on. The Style option allows you to select the number of digits in the page number, for example, 001 or 0001. Each part of the document that uses a different numbering style is called a section. For more information on sections, see Define section numbering.


One of the last things we need to do is our Table of Contents. We did this earlier, where we had different page numbering. So, all we need to do now is, because we've redefined all our Styles, and we're doing it all proper now, if we go to 'Layout'-- I've got my cursor flashing in here, first of all go to 'Layout', let's go to 'Update Table of Contents', and I'm going to click 'OK'. There's some spaces left in the front of this when I was messing around with it before, yours should be fine. So it's updated to the correct numbers. One thing I also did was I went in and adjusted the font from Medium to Light because I just liked it. I did that in between tutorials.
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
A List Style creates a set or group of styles. Word comes with built-in paragraph styles named Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3. But there is no connection between them. They just happen to share similar names. A List Style 'groups' those paragraph styles into some order. Only the List Style knows that Heading 1 is followed by Heading 2 and that it is followed by Heading 3. There are 9 levels in any List Style.
A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University. numbering in word
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