An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.
Using previously un-used heading levels would be more suitable for situations where you want to maintain two separate numbered lists that both make use of the "magic" properties of the built-in headings; for example, this would be the case when you set up appendix numbering as discussed in the article at https://shaunakelly.com/word/numbering/numberingappendixes.html.
Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.
Many Office programs will detect when you start a numbered or bulleted list and helpfully automate it, so that when you press Enter, new list items are automatically indented and bulleted or numbered. If this behavior isn’t actually all that helpful for you, and you’d rather control your own list-making without Office’s help, you can turn to your autocorrect options.

I wonder if I’m now up against a limitation of the feature: I have chapter numbers which are large and separated from the main text flow — each in its own text frame on the outer margin. These should be level 1 (‘X’) of the numbering system. Then the next heading (which is in the main body text flow) is level 2 (‘X.x’), and the next level 3 (‘X.x.x’). Unfortunately the level 2 headings do not follow from the level 1 numbering and I wonder if it’s because I’m using separate, non-linked frames for level 1? (The list does have ‘Continue Numbers across Stories’ checked.)
Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.

So now on the A master page in your Adobe InDesign document you should have a capital A in the text frame that we created. This is more than just a capital A though, this represents the A master in your Adobe Indesign document and it means that on every page that is attached to your A master the corresponding page number will appear in that position on your page.


One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.

I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.

Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. A Current Page Number marker must be set on pages in order to use this feature. The Current Page Number is a special character inserted in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended) where the page number will appear, by selecting Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
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