We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
@Aaron: I am stuck exactly with the same problem. I am constructing a style guide document, and thus my content is mainly images, not text. Still I do need numbered chapters in multiple levels, but the automatic numbering seems to be almost impossible as my headings are in separate text boxes. I have tried linking heading text areas, section markers, numbered lists and whatnot, but I am about to revert back to manual numbering instead of battling with this and wasting time! It’s just so devastating, I believe that machines should do what they do best, instead of people keeping track of numbering chapters!
Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.
 Does anybody have an easy way to set up sequential numbering in Coreldraw? Our shop has to lay out unit number plaques for vinyl cutting and sometimes my employee has to manually type in hundreds of numbers. I've read all the print merge suggestions for raffle tickets and such but I need the numbers entered into an object and not during the print process. 
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.

One of the harder things to do in Adobe InDesign, surprisingly for a page layout tool, is to create multilevel or outline format numbered lists.  The right way to accomplish this, according to the folks at Adobe, is to create a Style for every level of the list you’d like to have! Here are Adobe’s instructions on how to do so (This content is taken directly from https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/bullets-numbering.html#create_multi_level_lists):


InDesign allows you to add a page number marker to a master page within the document. The master page functions as a template for every page it's applied to, so the consecutive page numbers appear on every page. InDesign updates the page number automatically as you insert, delete and move pages. To add a page number marker to a master page, create a text box on the master page by going to the Type menu and choosing "Insert Special Character," "Markers" and then "Current Page Number."
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number. numbering using indesign
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