After years in the graphic design and art industry, there’s one thing that I can’t understand: why designers try to get along without Adobe InDesign. I’ve been using this program for many years, and it’s helped me work efficiently and productively. I’ve created this website to show everyone that InDesign is a program that you can and should learn, and the best program for layout and desktop publishing. If you’re interested, check out my book on creating an ePub with InDesign. It’s got all you need to know in order to take your eBook from the final draft to an interesting and well-formatted ePub book.
In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
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I have set up a multi-level list but when I insert a lower level list within a higher level list (ie. 1,2,3,then a,b,c) the higher level list does not continue as expected after the lower level list (in this case “4” is what I would want) but rather continues as if the lower level list were part of the higher level list (in this case “7”). Does anyone know how to fix this?
I find the numbered list feature to be completely confusing, even after reading Real World IDCS3. I just don’t seem to be able to wrap my brain around this feature…or maybe its just the dialogue box because the idea of list numbering makes perfect sense. I usually end up exhausting my vocabulary of not-very-nice words when I try to use this feature (and my vocabulary is fairly extensive).
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.
Numbering in Word is a bit of a nightmare at times and if you need multi-level numbering this could cause you much stress if you rely on the mouse alone. Using the keyboard to some degree makes this task very simple. I will explain how to create a multi-levelled numbered list and ask you to keep all the default formatting that Word gives you. This can be changed and modified but sometimes it messes up your layout. I advise to use what is there until you have the times and patience to master its intricacies.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
A List Style creates a set or group of styles. Word comes with built-in paragraph styles named Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3. But there is no connection between them. They just happen to share similar names. A List Style 'groups' those paragraph styles into some order. Only the List Style knows that Heading 1 is followed by Heading 2 and that it is followed by Heading 3. There are 9 levels in any List Style.
Numbering in Word is a bit of a nightmare at times and if you need multi-level numbering this could cause you much stress if you rely on the mouse alone. Using the keyboard to some degree makes this task very simple. I will explain how to create a multi-levelled numbered list and ask you to keep all the default formatting that Word gives you. This can be changed and modified but sometimes it messes up your layout. I advise to use what is there until you have the times and patience to master its intricacies.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
You can use Microsoft Word to create complex documents. Books and other large documents occasionally require different page number formats in different sections of one document. For example, you can number the index pages with Roman numerals (for example, "i.", "ii.", "iii.") and the main document with Arabic numerals (for example, "1", "2", "3"). This article describes how to set up different page numbering formats.
This is ideal if use certain tools with the same settings every time. SignTools Quick Palette Complete list of tools Shades & Decorations - SignTools 4 contains 13 quick and easy to use shades and decorations. Included are Outline, Relief Outline, Outline & Shade, Relief Outline & Shade, Drop Shade, Relief Drop Shade, Relief Effect, Inline, Cast Shade, Relief Cast Shade, Highlight, Emboss and Highlight & Sink.
I want to point out that if this document is a fixed set of standards but will be amended in later editions, then autonumbers will increment, which is a bad idea. In legal documents, numbers are usually static, and deletions are struck-through, not deleted, to preserve the original numbering, so that older and newer editions can be compared number-by-number. Inserted and appended content would need to be manually numbered. You may want to create the first edition with autonumbering, then convert the numbered list numbers to text, to avoid unwanted renumbering in future editions.

An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
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