Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
By default, bullets and numbers inherit some of their text formatting from the first character in the paragraph to which they’re attached. If the first character in one paragraph is different from the first characters in other paragraphs, the numbering or bullet character may appear inconsistent with the other list items. If this is not the formatting you desire, create a character style for numbers or bullets and apply it to your list by using the Bullets And Numbering dialog box.
This is ideal if use certain tools with the same settings every time. SignTools Quick Palette Complete list of tools Shades & Decorations - SignTools 4 contains 13 quick and easy to use shades and decorations. Included are Outline, Relief Outline, Outline & Shade, Relief Outline & Shade, Drop Shade, Relief Drop Shade, Relief Effect, Inline, Cast Shade, Relief Cast Shade, Highlight, Emboss and Highlight & Sink.
I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.
Now, modify the Paragraph settings of every Heading style so that the Left Indent is 0, and the Special indent is set to (none). Do this even if you want your headings to be indented from the left margin, and even if you want a hanging indent. Why? Because for outline-numbered styles, we will set the paragraph indent and the hanging indents (if any) when we set up the numbering.
Hopefully what this InDesign tutorial will show you is that page numbering in InDesign is just as easy to do as it is any other program, and much easier than in most. InDesign allows for quick, easy, and automatic page numbering, and I’ll be showing you how to do that today. It’s a simple trick to learn, takes only a few short seconds, and will be a skill that you will be thankful for every time you need to use it. You can always refer back to this InDesign tutorial should you forget any of the steps.
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.
InDesign is a popular publishing software application released by Adobe. It is often used by graphic designers to publish books, magazines and brochures. Along with important elements like text, graphics and logos, page numbers are essential to these publications. It is possible to add the page numbers during or after the document's completion, if you know where to look. This article will tell you how to add page numbers in InDesign.
You can't use Word's Numbering feature to generate a multilevel numbering system, even if you use built-in heading styles. Figure A shows a document with two styled heading levels: Heading 1 and Heading 2. You can apply the Numbering option (in the Paragraph group) and Word will number the headings consequently, but the feature ignores different levels; if you expected 1, 1.1, 2, 2.1, and 2.2, you might be surprised. If you select the entire document first, Numbering not only ignores the different levels, but it also numbers the paragraphs!
In Japanese, Chinese, or Korean versions, by default, Arabic numerals are used for page numbers. However, if you use the Numbering & Section Options command, you can specify the style of numbering, such as Roman numerals, Arabic numerals, Kanji, and so on. The Style option allows you to select the number of digits in the page number, for example, 001 or 0001. Each part of the document that uses a different numbering style is called a section. For more information on sections, see Define section numbering.

The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.

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